r3945 - jhalfs/trunk

pierre at higgs.linuxfromscratch.org pierre at higgs.linuxfromscratch.org
Mon Mar 27 12:49:04 PDT 2017


Author: pierre
Date: Mon Mar 27 12:49:04 2017
New Revision: 3945

Log:
Refactor two README files

Modified:
   jhalfs/trunk/README
   jhalfs/trunk/README.BLFS

Modified: jhalfs/trunk/README
==============================================================================
--- jhalfs/trunk/README	Mon Mar 27 12:12:06 2017	(r3944)
+++ jhalfs/trunk/README	Mon Mar 27 12:49:04 2017	(r3945)
@@ -2,146 +2,175 @@
 
 1. INTRODUCTION::
 
-     This collection of scripts, known as jhalfs, strives to create
-  accurate makefiles from the Linux From Scratch book series XML files.
-  This software is an evolution of the original "jhalfs-0.2" code developed
-  by Jeremy Huntwork.
-
-     The usage of this script assumes you have read and are familiar with
-  the book(s) and, therefore, the configuration variables found in menuconfig
-  interface will have meaning to you.
-
-  The list of supported books can be found at
-  http://wiki.linuxfromscratch.org/alfs/wiki/SupportedBooks
-
-  NOTES::
-  *.  The resulting Makefile takes considerable time to run to completion.
-  Lay in a supply of caffeine beverages.
-
-  *.  It is recommended that you temporarily unpack your linux kernel,
-  run <make menuconfig>, configure the kernel as per the book and save
-  the resulting .config file.
+     The scripts in this directory implement an automation of the building
+  of a GNU/LInux system, as described in the Linux From Scratch book series.
+  The name of the project is jhalfs: in that name, "alfs" stands for
+  "automated linux from scratch", and the initials "jh" have been kept since
+  the original "jhalfs-0.2" code developed by Jeremy Huntwork.
+
+     The list of supported books can be found at
+  http://wiki.linuxfromscratch.org/alfs/wiki/SupportedBooks.
+
+     The documentation is split among various README.* files. Here is a list
+  of what is in which:
+    - README (this file): instructions to use the LFS book. This should be
+      enough if you just want to build a base system as per the LFS book. It is
+      also a required reading for all the other projects.
+    - README.CLFS: supplementary instructions to use the CLFS book series.
+    - README.BLFS: instructions to install an automated build infrastructure
+      for the BLFS book. There are two ways to do so: (i) install the
+      tools at the end of an LFS build (CLFS is not supported in that case), or
+      (ii) install the tools on an already running system. Both methods are
+      described in that file.
+    - README.CUSTOM: instructions to run custom commands either during the xLFS
+      build, at the end of a xLFS build. Note that you will not find
+      instructions on how to write those commands, but some examples are
+      available.
+    - README.PACKAGE_MANAGEMENT: instructions to use package management during
+      the build (only for LFS, patches welcome for CLFS...)
+    - README.HLFS: very short file explaining why you cannot use HLFS with the
+      present tool version.
 
-  *.  Read carefully this file and the other README.* files before using
-  this tool.
+     Other sources of information are the context help in the menu interface,
+  and the xLFS books themselves.
 
 2. PREREQUISITES::
 
-     To use this tool you MUST:
-
-     - have experience building {c,h,b}LFS packages
-     - know how to edit and write shell scripts
-     - know how a Makefile works
-     - be able to trace build failures and to find what is causing them
-       (user error, package bug, {c,h,b}LFS command bug, or jhalfs code bug)
-
-     If you do not have the above skills, please don't use this tool.
+     As said elsewhere, it is strongly advised that you first build manually
+  a complete system before attempting to automate the build.
 
+     Of course the "Host System Requirements" should be fulfilled. The needed
+  supplementary packages are detailed at the bottom of the page:
+  http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/alfs/download.html
 
 3. INSTALLATION::
 
-     No installation is required. You should just run <make> in this directory.
+     No installation is required. You may want to move the files in this
+  directory to a convenient location, and then follow the instructions below.
 
 4. CONFIGURATION::
 
-     Configuration is done through a menu based interface. See the section
-     RUNNING, for details.
+  4.1. CONFIGURATION OF THE TOOLS:
+       There is no configuration of the tools themselves. The various
+    parameters for the build are set through a menu driven interface. See
+    the section RUNNING below for details.
+
+  4.2. PRELIMINARY TASKS:
+       This tool has no support at all for creating a partition and a mount
+    point for the built system. You should follow the book up to the section
+    "Mounting the new partition". Note that the default name for the
+    partition mount point is "/mnt/build_dir", instead of /mnt/{c,}lfs.
+    You can change that default to anything you'd like in the menu, so you
+    may name it /mnt/lfs, or whatever you like. One important point is that
+    the user you are logged in as (and not the (c)lfs user) should have write
+    permission to the mounted directory. We'll use the name /mnt/build_dir
+    in the sequel.
+
+       The tool can download the needed packages for you, or you may download
+    them yourself. The tool may optionally use a package archive directory
+    where the downloaded packages are stored. That directory name may be made
+    available to the tool in two ways: (i) export the SRC_ARCHIVE variable,
+    for example SRC_ARCHIVE=/usr/src, (ii) enter the name at the "Package
+    Archive Directory" menu prompt. Note that the user should have write
+    permission to that directory. If a needed package is found in that
+    directory, it is copied to /mnt/build_dir/sources, if not, it is
+    downloaded to that directory and copied to /mnt/build_dir/sources,
+    except if found in /mnt/build_dir/sources, in which case, it is just
+    copied to $SRC_ARCHIVE. If you want the tool to download packages and you
+    do not want to archive them, just unset SRC_ARCHIVE, and keep the
+    default entry for "Package Archive Directory". If you choose to download
+    the packages by yourself, you should download (or copy) them to
+    /mnt/build_dir/sources directly.
+    
+       If you want to build the kernel as part of the automated build, select
+    "Build the kernel" in the menu. Then, a configuration file must be
+    provided. In order to do so, it is recommended to download the kernel
+    tarball, unpack it, run <make menuconfig>, configure the kernel as per
+    the book, and save the resulting .config file to a location where it can
+    be retrieved later on (a convenient location and name is
+    $SRC_ARCHIVE/config-<arch>-<kernel version>-<config details>).
+
+       Another file you may provide is the fstab file. To use it, select
+    "Use a custom fstab file" in the menu interface, and enter the name of
+    the file where asked. As for the kernel configuration, this file has to
+    be prepared before running the menu. A convenient location and name is
+    $SRC_ARCHIVE/fstablfs.
+
+       At a more advanced level, you may want to supply custom commands
+    to be run at the end of (C)LFS build. Scripts containing those commands
+    are located in the ./custom/config directory. Examples are given in
+    ./custom/examples. A template is provided as ./custom/template. See
+    README.CUSTOM for more details.
 
 5. RUNNING::
 
-     The command <make> will launch a menu based configuration program. You will
-     recognize the layout from building the kernel or uClibc/BusyBox. The
-     underlying menu code was borrowed from BusyBox and slightly modified for
-     our use.
+     The command <make> will launch a menu based configuration program. The
+  underlying menu code was borrowed from BusyBox and slightly modified for
+  our use.
 
      Help on parameter function is available from the on-line help. Please
-     make use of that feature: it may contain additional information not
-     duplicated in this file.
+  make use of that feature: it may contain additional information not
+  duplicated in this file.
 
      You should first choose which book and flavour you want to build. Note
-     that when you choose the BLFS book, the tool will just install the BLFS
-     tool to your system. You'll have to run that installed tool to build
-     packages in BLFS. See README.BLFS to know how. If you choose any other
-     book, you'll have to configure the settings and the build parameters
-     from the menu. Note that you may choose to install the blfs tools onto
-     the newly built system (see below). It is not the same thing as choosing
-     the BLFS book in the menu, which will install the blfs tools on the
-     currently running system.
-    
+  that when you choose the BLFS book, the tool will just install the BLFS
+  tool to your system. You'll have to run that installed tool to build
+  packages in BLFS. See README.BLFS to know how. If you choose any other
+  book, you'll have to configure the settings and the build parameters
+  from the menu. Note that you may choose to install the blfs tools onto
+  the newly built system. It is not the same thing as choosing
+  the BLFS book in the menu, which will install the blfs tools on the
+  currently running system.
+
+     The "General Settings" menu is where the "Build Directory" name is to be
+  entered. Other entries in that menu select what the tool should do. The
+  "Run the Makefile" entry selects whether the tool will start the build
+  automatically after generating the needed files. The "Rebuild files" selects
+  whether to clean the build directory before doing anything else. To protect
+  against removing important files, this can only be done in an empty directory,
+  or a directory previously populated by the tool.
+
+     The "Build Settings" menu is where various options for the build can be
+  selected. Two options, "Use a custom fstab file" and "Build the kernel",
+  have been described above. "Do not use/display progress_bar", if set, will
+  prevent a progress bar to be displayed during the build. That may be useful
+  on slow machine. The other options should be self explanatory, using either
+  the online help or book reading.
+
+     The "Advanced Features" menu is for various maintenance tasks, like
+  testing the build instructions or reporting build statistics. One useful
+  option is "Optimization and parallelisation". It is not recommended to use
+  it for setting compiler optimization flags, although it is possible, but
+  if you select it, you'll be able to select the number of parallel `make'
+  jobs, which allows much faster builds on modern multicore CPUs.
 
      Once you have set the parameters and saved the configuration, the script
-     is launched. Its aim is to extract instructions from the selected book
-     to generate scripts, and to generate a Makefile, which allows running
-     the scripts in the right order. The script verifies first that the host
-     can run it and build the xLFS system, then validates the configuration
-     and lists the parameters. At this point, you may choose to quit or to
-     continue with the listed parameters. The script will then proceed to
-     generate the Makefile and the build scripts, optionally download
-     packages, and eventually verify the host prerequisite. If you have
-     selected "Run the makefile", the command make is launched in the
-     adequate directory, and the build begins. If not, you'll have to run
-     "make" manually, for example: "make -C /mnt/build_dir/jhalfs", if you
-     have used the default parameters (see the layout under $BUILDDIR in the
-     Q&A below).
-
-     IMPORTANT::
-         You must be logged as a normal user with sudo privileges to run
-         the Makefile. Furthermore, you are supposed to have enough privilege
-         to become any user. If you are not bothered about security issues,
-         the entry for the user "jhalfs_user" in /etc/sudoers could be
-         jhalfs_user ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL
-
-     NOTE::
-         If you run the jhalfs script directly the only function you can select
-         is to display the version number running <./jhalfs -v>
-
-6. BLFS_TOOL SUPPORT::
-
-     For books that support it (only LFS for jhalfs version 2.4),
-     there is an option to install an automated framework for building BLFS
-     packages. It is called blfs-tool. When you tick `BOOK Settings/Add
-     blfs-tool support' in jhalfs configuration menu, the tools are
-     installed in $BLFS_ROOT (default /blfs_root) on the xLFS system,
-     and a few dependencies (which you may select) are built at the
-     end of the jhalfs run, before the custom tools. The instructions for
-     building the dependencies are taken from the BLFS book.
-
-     (TODO: blfs-tools have not been tested with current (version 3.0) of CLFS,
-     and certainly need some adaptation to run)
-     WARNING:: If you add blfs-tool support on a CLFS Sysroot build
-               you MUST edit the scripts to fix the installation paths.
-
-     After booting the new xLFS system some steps are needed to finish
-     the installation of the automated tools:
-
-       - A user account must be created. You must be logged on that user
-         account to use blfs-tool. This is not strictly necessary,
-         since the packages can be built as root, too, but it is
-         never a good idea to build packages as root.
-
-       - Move /blfs-root to that user's home and change ownership of the
-         directory and files to the user.
-
-       - Give the user read and write privileges over the $TRACKING_DIR
-         directory and the files that it contains.
-
-       - Configure sudo, adding the needed privileges for the user. For
-         newer sudo version, do not forget to add a line Defaults secure_path=
-         containing /sbin and /usr/sbin (in /etc/sudoers), otherwise some
-         executables are not found.
-
-       - Although it is not strictly necessary, it is recommended to install
-         the bash shell startup files (as per `3.After LFS Configuration
-         Issues' of the BLFS book), as some instructions in BLFS rely on
-         their being present.
-
-     We assume that blfs-tool will be used on a running fresh xLFS system.
-     To use it to build BLFS packages from the chroot jail is also possible,
-     but not supported.
-
-     To know how to use blfs-tool, see README.BLFS.
+  is launched. Its aim is to extract instructions from the selected book
+  to generate scripts, and to generate a Makefile, which allows running
+  the scripts in the right order. The script verifies first that the host
+  can run itself and build the xLFS system, then validates the configuration
+  and lists the parameters. At this point, you may choose to quit or to
+  continue with the listed parameters. The script will then proceed to
+  generate the Makefile and the build scripts, optionally download
+  packages, and eventually verify the host prerequisite. If you have
+  selected "Run the makefile", the command <make> is launched in the
+  adequate directory, and the build begins. If not, you'll have to run
+  "make" manually, for example: "make -C /mnt/build_dir/jhalfs", if you
+  have used the default parameters (see the layout under $BUILDDIR in the
+  Q&A below).
+
+  IMPORTANT::
+      You must be logged as a normal user with sudo privileges to run
+      the Makefile. Furthermore, you are supposed to have enough privilege
+      to become any user. If you are not bothered about security issues,
+      the entry for the user "jhalfs_user" in /etc/sudoers could be
+      jhalfs_user ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL
+
+  NOTE::
+      If you run the jhalfs script directly the only function you can select
+      is to display the version number by running <./jhalfs -v>
 
-7. LAYOUT::
+6. LAYOUT::
 
         /BLFS (see README.BLFS)
 
@@ -204,21 +233,16 @@
         jhalfs
         blfs-tool
 
-8. FAQ::
-    Q. "This 'help' file is very sparse"
-    A. Yes, it is. This tool, jhalfs, is for those who understand the LFS books
-       and wish to automate the build. 99% of any problems that arise can be
-       solved by reading the book(s).
-
-    Q. "It doesn't work!"
-    A. Yes it does, try >> make
-       Remember you must have 'sudo' privileges.
-
-    Q. "It still doesn't work"
-    A. jhalfs was designed to work against the development versions of the LFS
-       series of books. Consequently changes in a book(s) sometimes breaks older
-       versions of jhalfs. Before you start pulling out your hair download the
-       latest version of jhalfs to see if that solves your problem.
+7. FAQ::
+    Q. "It doesn't work"
+    A. There are several reasons why it may be so. One possibility is the
+       following:jhalfs was designed to work against the development versions
+       of the LFS series of books. Consequently changes in a book(s) sometimes
+       breaks older versions of jhalfs. Before you start pulling out your hair
+       download the latest version of jhalfs to see if that solves your
+       problem. Note that it may be the other way around. If you want to build
+       an old version of the book, you may have to downgrade you jahlfs
+       version.
 
     Q. "How do I specify the build location?"
     A. The original LFS document worked against the well known location

Modified: jhalfs/trunk/README.BLFS
==============================================================================
--- jhalfs/trunk/README.BLFS	Mon Mar 27 12:12:06 2017	(r3944)
+++ jhalfs/trunk/README.BLFS	Mon Mar 27 12:49:04 2017	(r3945)
@@ -2,10 +2,6 @@
 
 1. INTRODUCTION::
 
-     If you want to add blfs-tool support into an xLFS base system build,
-  read the "BLFS_TOOL SUPPORT" section found in the README and be sure
-  to follow the after-booting installation instructions.
-
      To automate package builds from the BLFS book instructions is a huge
   task. Some of the issues are: the BLFS book isn't linear; some package
   pages use a custom layout; there are circular dependencies; several
@@ -20,55 +16,88 @@
 
 2. PREREQUISITES::
 
-     To use this tool you MUST:
-
-     - have experience building BLFS packages
-     - know how to edit and write shell scripts
-     - know how a Makefile works
-     - be able to trace build failures and to find what is causing it
-       (user error, package bug, BLFS command bug, or jhalfs code bug)
-
-     If you do not have the above skills, please don't use this tool.
-
-
-3. USAGE::
-
-     Due to the complexity of the BLFS book, the scripts and Makefile
-     generation is done in several steps:
-
-  3.1  INSTALLED PACKAGES TRACKING SYSTEM::
-
-       This tool includes a very simple tracking system to log which packages
-    have been installed using the tool. It is used to skip installed packages
-    from target selection menu and to test if an installed package has been
-    updated in the BLFS book. Do not rely on this feature as a package
-    management tool.
+     In addition to a full LFS system, the following packages and their
+  dependencies are needed by this tool:
+    - required: libxml2, libxslt, DocBook XML DTD
+    - recommended: wget (to download the package tarballs) and sudo (to build
+      as a user)
+    - optional: lynx (allows to read the generated linearized book), GPM (to
+      cut and paste commands from the book), subversion (to update the book
+      sources), openssl (used by wget for all https:// sites)
+  Note that the optional dependencies are recommended for ease of use of the
+  tool.
+
+     You should also have the following personal skills:
+    - Ability to write and debug shell scripts: as said in the introduction,
+      not all the generated scripts can be used directly. They need to be
+      edited to produce an error free build.
+    - Ability to debug build failures, like missing dependencies or
+      installation directories not known to the system (when you install in
+      /opt for example).
+    - Ability to choose the tools you need to configure and administrate
+      your system: in the BLFS book, nothing is mandatory, nothing is
+      useless. You are on your own in choosing what to build, but wrong
+      decisions may lead to a non functional system...
+
+3. INSTALL::
+
+     There are two ways to install the BLFS tools on an LFS system, described
+  in paragraphs 3.1 and 3.2, respectively:
+
+  3.1 INSTALLATION ON A RUNNING SYSTEM
+
+     Select "Use Book --> Beyond Linux From Scratch" in the jhalfs menu:
+  The tools are installed in $HOME$BLFS_ROOT (the default for $BLFS_ROOT
+  is /blfs_root). The BLFS book is downloaded or copied to its directory.
+  The tracking directory (see below) is initialized but not created: before
+  the installation, you should ensure the tracking directory (default location
+  /var/lib/jhalfs/BLFS) exists and is writable by the user. After the
+  intallation, you should perform the following additional steps:
+
+    - Configure sudo, adding the needed privileges for the user. For
+      newer sudo version, do not forget to add a line `Defaults secure_path='
+      containing /sbin and /usr/sbin (in /etc/sudoers), otherwise some
+      executables are not found.
+
+    - Although it is not strictly necessary, it is recommended to install
+      the bash shell startup files (as per `3.After LFS Configuration
+      Issues' of the BLFS book), as some instructions in BLFS rely on
+      their being present.
+
+  3.2 INSTALLATION ON A JUST BUILT xLFS SYSTEM
+
+    For books that support it (only LFS for jhalfs version 2.4),
+  there is an option to install the BLFS tools right after building
+  the xLFS system: just tick `BOOK Settings/Add blfs-tool support' in
+  jhalfs configuration menu. The tools are installed in $BLFS_ROOT
+  (default /blfs_root) on the xLFS system, and the dependencies are built
+  at the end of the jhalfs run, before the custom tools.
+
+  (TODO: blfs-tools have not been tested with current (version 3.0) of CLFS,
+  and certainly need some adaptation to run)
+
+  After booting the new xLFS system some steps are needed to finish
+  the installation of the automated tools:
+
+    - A user account must be created. You must be logged on that user
+      account to use blfs-tool. This is not strictly necessary,
+      since the packages can be built as root, too, but it is
+      never a good idea to build packages as root.
+
+    - Move /blfs-root to that user's home and change ownership of the
+      directory and files to the user.
+
+    - Give the user read and write privileges over the $TRACKING_DIR
+      directory and the files that it contains.
+
+    - Configure sudo and add the bash shell startup files, as described
+      above
+
+     We assume that the BLFS tools will be used on a booted xLFS system.
+  Using them to build BLFS packages in a chroot jail is also possible,
+  but not supported.
 
-       The tracking system itself is an XML file: instpkg.xml. It is
-    initialized when <make> is first run in blfs_root. It resides in a
-    directory, which is created when needed during the process of building
-    custom tools or blfs dependencies, right after xLFS. You can specify
-    that directory location in the blfs-tools sub-menu of jhalfs. You may
-    need to update permissions and/or ownership of this directory before
-    using the blfs tool (see README in jhalfs).
-
-       The default location of the tracking directory is /var/lib/jhalfs/BLFS.
-    NB : after the initial build, that directory is only used to contain
-    instpkg.xml, unless custom tools have been built. In the latter case,
-    it also contains empty files whose name are "$PKG-$VERSION" for each
-    versionned package built. The information about those packages is
-    included into instpkg.xml the next time the tool is run.
-
-  3.2  BLFS_TOOL INSTALLATION::
-
-    3.2.1 Normal install
-       The tools are installed just after the building of xLFS, if the
-    appropriate options have been selected in the building menu, as per
-    jhalfs README. If you forgot to select the options and xLFS has been
-    built, it is possible to go back to selecting the appropriate
-    BLFS tools options in the jhalfs menu, then tick `Run makefile'
-    and not `Rebuild files'. You obtain a /blfs_root directory in the
-    root directory of the new xLFS system, which contains the followings:
+  3.3 DIRECTORY LAYOUT IN THE $BLFS_ROOT DIRECTORY
 
     blfs-xml/*              SVN tree of the selected BLFS book version
     lib/constants.inc       functions libraries 
@@ -98,17 +127,7 @@
                             database and the tracking file.
     envars.conf             envars needed when running the target build scripts
 
-    3.2.2 Install to an already running LFS/BLFS system
-       If you forgot to install the tools when building xLFS, or want to try
-    the tools, you can select the BLFS book from the jhalfs menu. It will
-    run a script, which creates the above hierarchy in your home directory and
-    initialize the tracking file. You have first to make sure that the tracking
-    dir exists and is writable by the user. You may also populate it with
-    (empty) files whose names are of the form package-version, for installed
-    packages, so that they are included into the tracking file.
-
-    3.3.3 Working files
-        Several files are generated during the process:
+    Working files: several files are generated when first running the tool
 
     packages.xml            auto-generated packages database
     Config.in               input file for the menu driven choices
@@ -118,13 +137,38 @@
     book-html/*             the linearized book rendered in html
     scripts/*               the scriptlets
 
+  3.4 INSTALLED PACKAGES TRACKING SYSTEM:
+
+       This tool includes a very simple tracking system to log which packages
+    have been installed using the tool. It is used to skip installed packages
+    from target selection menu and to test if an installed package has been
+    updated in the BLFS book. Do not rely on this feature as a package
+    management tool.
+
+       The tracking system itself is an XML file: instpkg.xml. It is
+    initialized when <make> is first run in blfs_root. It resides in a
+    directory, which is created when needed during the process of building
+    custom tools or blfs dependencies, right after xLFS. You can specify
+    that directory location in the blfs-tools sub-menu of jhalfs. You may
+    need to update permissions and/or ownership of this directory before
+    using the blfs tool (see README in jhalfs).
+
+       The default location of the tracking directory is /var/lib/jhalfs/BLFS.
+    NB : after the initial build, that directory is only used to contain
+    instpkg.xml, unless custom tools have been built. In the latter case,
+    it also contains empty files whose name are "$PKG-$VERSION" for each
+    versionned package built. The information about those packages is
+    included into instpkg.xml the next time the tool is run.
+
+4. USAGE::
+
        From now on, all the work must be done from inside the installation
     root directory.
 
-       You may move that directory to the $HOME of a non root user, or build
-    as root from that directory.
+     Due to the complexity of the BLFS book, the scripts and Makefile
+     generation is done in several steps:
 
-  3.3  UPDATING BOOK SOURCES::
+  4.1  UPDATING BOOK SOURCES::
 
        If you are using the development book version and you want to update
     installed packages to the latest version found in that book, you need to
@@ -142,7 +186,7 @@
     with a new version in the book will be available for target selection
     and used to solve dependencies.
 
-  3.4  CONFIGURING AND PARSING THE BOOK::
+  4.2  CONFIGURING AND PARSING THE BOOK::
 
        The next step is to create a book and build scripts in dependency
     build order for one or several packages.
@@ -180,7 +224,7 @@
        There is also another directory, "dependencies" that contains files
     generated while resolving dependencies.
 
-  3.5  EDITING BUILD SCRIPTS::
+  4.3  EDITING BUILD SCRIPTS::
 
        Now it is time to review the generated book and scripts, making any
     changes to the scripts necessary to fix generation bugs or to suit your
@@ -197,7 +241,7 @@
       Also, review and edit envars.conf. This file is used to set global envars
     needed by the build scripts.
 
-  3.6  CREATING THE MAKEFILE::
+  4.4  CREATING THE MAKEFILE::
 
        When the build scripts are ready to be run, the Makefile can be
     created. Create an empty directory (for example "mkdir work") and cd
@@ -206,7 +250,7 @@
     Review the Makefile, and, if all looks sane, start the build by running
     "make".
 
-4. GENERATED BUILD SCRIPTS ISSUES::
+5. GENERATED BUILD SCRIPTS ISSUES::
 
       In this section, known issues with the generated build scripts are
    discussed. They are due to build procedures and/or BLFS layout
@@ -222,14 +266,14 @@
    to another name (using the xxx-a- fields), and possibly renaming the xxx-a-
    fields of each involved script.
 
-   4.1  BLFS BOOTSCRIPTS::
+   5.1  BLFS BOOTSCRIPTS::
 
         Normally, bootscript installation should work. On the other hand, the
      book does not give instruction for running them, so you might have to
      manually insert "/etc/init.d/rc.d/<initscript> start" at some place during
      the build.
 
-   4.2  PACKAGE CONFIGURATION::
+   5.2  PACKAGE CONFIGURATION::
 
         For those packages that have a "Configuration" section, you should
      edit the build script to fit the needs of your system. Sometimes, the
@@ -237,7 +281,7 @@
      line 'source /etc/profile', which ensures that the proper environment
      variables are used.
 
-   4.3  PAGES WITH TWO OR MORE PACKAGES::
+   5.3  PAGES WITH TWO OR MORE PACKAGES::
 
         For example: sane, poppler, audacious, freetts, which, etc.
 
@@ -248,7 +292,7 @@
      name (for example PKG1, PKG2, etc) after each download. The unpacking
      instructions may need to be repeated for each tarball in turn.
 
-   4.4  XORG7
+   5.4  XORG7
 
         The book has special page layouts for the Xorg7 packages. The tool
      breaks those pages into individual pages for each packages in the linear
@@ -257,13 +301,13 @@
         To build the whole Xorg7 chapter, select twm. The (recommended)
      dependency chain brings in the whole set of Xorg packages.
 
-   4.5  PATCHES
+   5.5  PATCHES
 
         Please, make sure that all scripts have the commands to download/apply
      the required patches. Due to book layout issues, some patches may be
      missing (as of BLFS 8.0, all the patches seem to be downloaded).
 
-   4.6  ROOT COMMANDS
+   5.6  ROOT COMMANDS
 
         If building as a normal user (the default setting), be sure that all
      commands that require root privileges are run using sudo. Also make sure
@@ -292,7 +336,7 @@
 
         Due to book layout issues, some sudo commands may be missing.
 
-   4.7  OTHERS
+   5.7  OTHERS
 
         There may be other issues that we are not aware of. If you find
      any, please report it to <alfs-discuss at linuxfromscratch.org>.


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