cvs commit: hints openssh_remote_floppy.txt

timothy at linuxfromscratch.org timothy at linuxfromscratch.org
Thu Oct 17 10:31:01 PDT 2002


timothy     02/10/17 10:31:01

  Modified:    .        openssh_remote_floppy.txt
  Log:
  Alignment fixes submitted by Archaic.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.4       +70 -30    hints/openssh_remote_floppy.txt
  
  Index: openssh_remote_floppy.txt
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/hints/openssh_remote_floppy.txt,v
  retrieving revision 1.3
  retrieving revision 1.4
  diff -u -r1.3 -r1.4
  --- openssh_remote_floppy.txt	14 Oct 2002 20:09:25 -0000	1.3
  +++ openssh_remote_floppy.txt	17 Oct 2002 17:31:01 -0000	1.4
  @@ -2,22 +2,23 @@
   LFS VERSION:	All
   AUTHOR:		Arturo Rangel <izaram at yahoo.com>
   
  -
   SYNOPSIS:
  -	How to configure OpenSSH to be even more secure and how to make
  -a floppy disk that you can use on almost any Windows machine to access your
  +
  +	How to configure OpenSSH to be even more secure and how to make a
  +floppy disk that you can use on almost any Windows machine to access your
   machine remotely.
   	
   HINT:
   	09/03/2001 - First publication
   	09/04/2001 - Minor changes in formatting
   	10/11/2002 - Yay! Updated for SSH2, portable
  -		     between different versions of Windos (tested in 98SE, ME					
  +		     between different versions of Windos (tested in 98SE, ME
   		     and XP Professional)
   	
   INTRODUCTION
  -	Once I had my shiny LFS system I wanted to be with it all the
  -time. I wanted to work on it from work, from my girlfriend's house, from school,
  +
  +	Once I had my shiny LFS system I wanted to be with it all the time. I
  +wanted to work on it from work, from my girlfriend's house, from school,
   everywhere. So I went out and read some documentation on how to set up OpenSSH
   (including Daniel's hint on
   http://hints.linuxfromscratch.org/hints/openssh.txt). Here's a summary of what
  @@ -25,17 +26,19 @@
   	
   
   DISCLAIMER
  -	Just like the one the great Kevin Smith has at the beginning of
  -Dogma (go watch that movie if you have no idea what I'm talking about). Please
  -make sure you know what you are doing (or at least have an idea of what you are
  -doing) when you follow this hint. The author cannot be made responsible
  -for any missed configuration, run-over cats, hair loss or any other problem
  -that arises directly or indirectly from following the simple instructions
  -stated here. Now that we got that out of the way, let's move on.
  +
  +	Just like the one the great Kevin Smith has at the beginning of Dogma
  +(go watch that movie if you have no idea what I'm talking about). Please make
  +sure you know what you are doing (or at least have an idea of what you are
  +doing) when you follow this hint. The author cannot be made responsible for any
  +missed configuration, run-over cats, hair loss or any other problem that arises
  +directly or indirectly from following the simple instructions stated here. Now
  +that we got that out of the way, let's move on.
   		
   SETTING UP THE SERVER	
  -	First of all, in order to make your machine more secure you need
  -to disable the regular telnet daemon and make sure that OpenSSH gets started at
  +
  +	First of all, in order to make your machine more secure you need to
  +disable the regular telnet daemon and make sure that OpenSSH gets started at
   bootup (read Daniel's hint on how to do this). Once you have a running OpenSSH
   fire up your favorite editor to change its configuration (the file in my system
   is /etc/ssh/sshd_config).
  @@ -63,7 +66,8 @@
   into their laptop) whenever they want to log into the system. This might sound
   a little cumbersome but the increased security is well worth it in my opinion.
   		
  -	Please make sure you read the Domain mini-HOWTO (1) if you want to learn how to do do some other tricks (such as tunneling X over the connection)
  +	Please make sure you read the Domain mini-HOWTO (1) if you want to
  +learn how to do do some other tricks (such as tunneling X over the connection)
   
   CREATING YOUR PRIVATE/PUBLIC KEY COMBO
   	
  @@ -73,29 +77,65 @@
   	
           ssh-keygen -b 1024 -f new_rsa_key
           
  -        This command will create two files in the curent directory: new_rsa_key and new_rsa_key.pub. The first file is the private key and the second is the public key (hence the .pub extension :). This key pair is v1 by default, read on to create a v2 key.
  +	This command will create two files in the curent directory: new_rsa_key
  +and new_rsa_key.pub. The first file is the private key and the second is the
  +public key (hence the .pub extension :). This key pair is v1 by default, read
  +on to create a v2 key.
           
  -        For a v2 key, the key has to be created using PuTTYgen, available from the same place PuTTY is (2). Start up PuTTYgen and select SSH2 RSA as the type of key you want to generate. Click on Generate and follow the instructions while you wait for your key pair to be created. Once it's done, copy the text that's supposed to go into your authorized_keys2 file, and save it into a file. This is your public key. Click on Save private key and keep that file somewhere handy. We'll come back to it. 
  -	
  -	Using either method, the user will be asked for a pass phrase. Make_sure_this_is_not_blank. Doing that would mean that if someone found the private key they would be able to use it to gain easy acces to your system.  Now have them copy the public key file into their $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys file for v1 or $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys2 for v2. (You can simply type 'cat new_rsa_key.pub >> $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys (or) authorized_keys2' depending on the protocol version you are using).
  +	For a v2 key, the key has to be created using PuTTYgen, available from
  +the same place PuTTY is (2). Start up PuTTYgen and select SSH2 RSA as the type
  +of key you want to generate. Click on Generate and follow the instructions
  +while you wait for your key pair to be created. Once it's done, copy the text
  +that's supposed to go into your authorized_keys2 file, and save it into a file.
  +This is your public key. Click on Save private key and keep that file somewhere
  +handy. We'll come back to it. 
  +	
  +	Using either method, the user will be asked for a pass phrase.
  +Make_sure_this_is_not_blank. Doing that would mean that if someone found the
  +private key they would be able to use it to gain easy acces to your system.
  +Now have them copy the public key file into their $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys
  +file for v1 or $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys2 for v2. (You can simply type 'cat
  +new_rsa_key.pub >> $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys (or) authorized_keys2' depending
  +on the protocol version you are using).
   	
   CREATING YOUR PORTABLE CLIENT
  -	Now the fun part. Copy the private key (new_rsa_key, or the one you saved from PuTTYgen) file into a floppy and also put a copy of PuTTY (2), the great ssh client for Windows, into the same floppy. Configure PuTTY with your server parameters, etc. Make sure you select the appropiate protocol version and that you point to the private key you saved before.
  -	
  -	PuTTY saves the fingerprint of every host it connects to in the Windows registry to make sure that you are connecting to a host that has confirmed its "identity" with you. The only downside to this is that you are not able to carry this information with you, at least not easily.
  -	
  -	Here's what to do to save that information (as well as any changes you make to the PuTTY configuration) and have it ready on the go. You can either follow the instructions from the PuTTY authors and create a batch file with some .reg files (3), or you can download a small VB program I wrote (4). The difference between the two methods is that my program works between different versions of Windows, since starting with Win2K, the files exported from the registry are Unicode as opposed to regular ANSI files. This prevents older versions of Windows from importing files that come from Win2K and WinXP machines.
  -	
  -	Please be aware that using any of these two methods (a batch file or
  -my little program) might cause your current settings to be deleted from the registry. (Well, ahem, at least *my* program warns you if that might happen :)
  +
  +	Now the fun part. Copy the private key (new_rsa_key, or the one you
  +saved from PuTTYgen) file into a floppy and also put a copy of PuTTY (2), the
  +great ssh client for Windows, into the same floppy. Configure PuTTY with your
  +server parameters, etc. Make sure you select the appropiate protocol version
  +and that you point to the private key you saved before.
  +	
  +	PuTTY saves the fingerprint of every host it connects to in the Windows
  +registry to make sure that you are connecting to a host that has confirmed its
  +"identity" with you. The only downside to this is that you are not able to
  +carry this information with you, at least not easily.
  +	
  +	Here's what to do to save that information (as well as any changes you
  +make to the PuTTY configuration) and have it ready on the go. You can either
  +follow the instructions from the PuTTY authors and create a batch file with
  +some .reg files (3), or you can download a small VB program I wrote (4). The
  +difference between the two methods is that my program works between different
  +versions of Windows, since starting with Win2K, the files exported from the
  +registry are Unicode as opposed to regular ANSI files. This prevents older
  +versions of Windows from importing files that come from Win2K and WinXP
  +machines.
  +	
  +	Please be aware that using any of these two methods (a batch file or my
  +little program) might cause your current settings to be deleted from the
  +registry. (Well, ahem, at least *my* program warns you if that might happen :)
   	
   CONCLUSION
  +
   	Like I said at the beginning; I hope that you learned from this hint
   and that it helps you have a far more secured server. Feel free to contact me
   if you have any questions. I will try to answer the best I can.
   			
   NOTES
  -	I have tested these instructions on Win 98SE/ME/XP machines. I have yet to try on 95/NT/2K, but I see no reason for it not to work. I will update this hint if I receive confirmations of it working on said machines.
  +
  +	I have tested these instructions on Win 98SE/ME/XP machines. I have yet
  +to try on 95/NT/2K, but I see no reason for it not to work. I will update this
  +hint if I receive confirmations of it working on said machines.
   		
   FOOTNOTES
   
  @@ -106,4 +146,4 @@
   (3) Instruction on how to set up a DOS batch file for PuTTY are found here:
       http://www.tartarus.org/~owen/putty-docs/Section3.13.html
   (4) Or you can use the small program I wrote downloadable from:
  -    http://izaram.net/pages/misc/PuTTYwrap.zip
  \ No newline at end of file
  +    http://izaram.net/pages/misc/PuTTYwrap.zip
  
  
  
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