r922 - trunk

tushar at linuxfromscratch.org tushar at linuxfromscratch.org
Sun Jan 2 01:31:38 PST 2005


Author: tushar
Date: 2005-01-02 02:31:37 -0700 (Sun, 02 Jan 2005)
New Revision: 922

Modified:
   trunk/essential_prereading.txt
Log:
Updated Hint: essential_prereading

Modified: trunk/essential_prereading.txt
===================================================================
--- trunk/essential_prereading.txt	2004-12-13 05:53:47 UTC (rev 921)
+++ trunk/essential_prereading.txt	2005-01-02 09:31:37 UTC (rev 922)
@@ -1,299 +1,333 @@
-AUTHOR: Richard A Downing FBCS <geek109XXXhotmailXXXcom>
-DATE: 2004-01-15
-LICENSE: GNU Free Documentation License Version 1.2
+Essential pre-reading for life with LFS.
+
+AUTHOR: Richard A Downing FBCS CITP <TheOldFellow at gmail dot com>
+DATE: 2004-12-28
+LICENSE: Creative Commons - Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0
 SYNOPSIS: Essential pre-reading for life with LFS.
 
-IMPORTANT NOTE:
+DESCRIPTION: This hint is a list of good documents that you can get
+for free on the Internet, together with some advice from me and my
+friends. It will help you get 'educated' to a level where you can:
+ 1. successfully build [1]Linux from Scratch (LFS)
+ 2. ask sensible questions on the LFS mailing lists and understand the
+ replies.
+ 3. stay sane while doing all this.
 
-You will find a better maintained version of this hint on-line at:
+PREREQUISITES: Just the ability to switch on the computer and access
+the Internet, navigate to the LFS website and find the hint. The rest
+is our topic...
 
-	http://www.109bean.org.uk/LFS-prereading.html
-	
-The URL links are easier to follow too.
+HINT:
 
-DESCRIPTION:
+Please Note:
+  * This will always be a 'work in progress' and I'm missing a good
+ reference on some stuff. So, if you know of, or find a good one,
+ please write to me. Also I just like feedback, so it never hurts
+ to send an email.
+  * If you are reading a text version, you will find a better
+ maintained version of this hint on-line at:
+ http://www.109bean.org.uk/lfsdocs/LFS-prereading.html - The URL
+ links are easier to follow too.
+  * I generate the text version of this hint by applying lynx -dump to
+ the web version. This means that the URL's are collected at the
+ end. This isn't so convenient for you, but it is really neat for
+ me.
 
-This hint is a list of good documents that you can get for free 
-on the Internet, together with some advice from me and my friends. It will 
-help you get 'educated' to a level where you can:
+The LFS book says:
 
-  1)  build LFS successfully
-  2)  ask sensible questions on the LFS lists and understand the replies.
-  3)  stay sane while doing all this.
+"This book assumes that its reader has a good deal of knowledge about
+using and installing Linux software."
 
-Please Note: This will always be a 'work in progress' and I'm missing a good
-reference on some stuff. So, if you know of, or find a good one, please write
-me.   Also I just like feedback, so it never hurts to send an email.
+The book then suggests some further reading, including this document.
+But this is more than just an LFS reading list, we expect you to do
+some exercises too.
 
+Part 1. Social stuff. (Most important)
 
-In the LFS book, Gerard says:
+Many people ask questions badly on the LFS mailing lists. Sometimes
+they get rude replies. To stay sane, I suggest you read the
+entertaining [2]How To Ask Questions The Smart Way by Eric Steven
+Raymond.
 
-  "This book assumes that its reader has a good deal of knowledge about 
-  using and installing Linux software."
+Please note that all the LFS mailing lists expect:
+ 1. plain text email. No HTML.
+ 2. bottom posting. Add your bit UNDERNEATH the bit you quoted.
+ 3. pruned quotes. Don't quote everything, just the significant bit.
+ 4. no cross-posts. Just use the right list.
+ 5. thick skins. Don't respond to rudeness, just ignore it.
+ 6. [3]zazen. (Just Sitting) If others have a flame-war, just sit and
+ watch.
 
-Gerard then suggests some reading.  I suggest some more here, and some 
-exercises to go with them.
+Before asking questions on lfs lists, please search the archives, at
+least the recent months, and please read [4]The LFS FAQ. Read the
+latest copy online, not some old thing you downloaded last week.
 
-PREREQUISITES:
-Just the ability to switch on the computer and access the Internet,
-navigate to the LFS website and find the hint.  The rest is our topic...
+If you ask a question that is in the FAQ, you are being extremely
+rude, not least to the maintainer who does that job out of the
+goodness of their heart. So you rightly WILL get flamed.
 
-HINT:
+Special note: If someone tells you to RTFM, they are not, repeat NOT,
+being rude or getting at you. This is the accepted phrase indicating
+that you need to Read The Friendly Manual. If you have previously been
+told that a certain Old Low Dutch word is referred to by the 'F',
+please be assured that this is just a myth :-)
 
-Part 1. Social stuff. (MOST important)
---------------------------------------
+Part 2. Technical stuff.
 
-Many people ask questions badly on the LFS mailing lists.  Sometimes they 
-get rude replies.  Read this to stay sane.
+Many people attempt to build LFS without sufficient understanding or
+experience with LINUX. Here is an excerpt from the tar manual:
 
-    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
+"You should understand something about how Unix-type operating systems
+work, and you should know how to use some basic utilities. For
+example, you should know how to create, list, copy, rename, edit, and
+delete files and directories; how to change between directories; and
+how to figure out where you are in the filesystem. You should have
+some basic understanding of directory structure and how files are
+named according to which directory they are in. You should understand
+concepts such as standard output and standard input, what various
+definitions of the term "argument" mean, the differences between
+relative and absolute path names"
 
-Please note that all the LFS mailing lists expect:
+In the LFS book, it says:
 
-  1) plain text email.  No HTML.
-  2) bottom posting.  Add your bit UNDERNEATH the bit you quoted.
-  3) pruned quotes.  Don't quote everything, just the significant bit.
-  4) no cross-posts.  Just use the right list.
-  5) thick skins.  Don't respond to rudeness, just ignore it.
-  6) zazen.  (Just Sitting) If others have a flame-war, just sit and watch.
-  
-Before asking questions on lfs lists, please search the archives, at least 
-the recent months, and PLEASE READ THE FAQ.  Read the latest copy online,
-not some old thing you downloaded last week.
+"We are going to build the LFS system by using a previously installed
+Linux distribution such as Debian, SuSE, Slackware, Mandrake, RedHat,
+etc. We will use the existing Linux system as the development
+platform, because we need tools like a compiler, linker, text editor,
+and other development tools to build our system. Get a modern distro
+and play with it."
 
-    http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/faq/
-
-If you ask a question that is in the FAQ, you are being extremely rude, 
-not least to Seth who maintains it (wonderfully).  So you rightly WILL get 
-flamed.
-
-Special note:
--------------
-If someone tells you to RTFM, they are not, repeat NOT, being rude 
-or getting at you.  This is the accepted phrase indicating that you need to 
-Read The Friendly Manual.  If you have previously been told that a 
-certain Old Low Dutch word is referred to by the 'F', please be assured 
-that this is just a myth :-) 
-
-Part 2. Technical stuff.
-------------------------
-
-Many people attempt to build LFS without sufficient understanding 
-or experience with LINUX.  Here is an excerpt from the tar manual:
-
-   "you should understand something about how Unix-type operating systems
-    work, and you should know how to use some basic utilities.  
-    For example, you should know how to create, list, copy, rename, 
-    edit, and delete files and directories; how to change between 
-    directories; and how to figure out where you are in the filesystem. 
-    You should have some basic understanding of directory structure and 
-    how files are named according to which directory they are in.  You 
-    should understand concepts such as standard output and standard 
-    input, what various definitions of the term "argument" mean, the    
-    differences between relative and absolute path names"
-   
-In the LFS book, Gerard says:
-    
-  "We are going to build the LFS system by using a 
-   previously installed Linux distribution such as Debian, SuSE, Slackware, 
-   Mandrake, RedHat, etc. We will use the existing Linux system as the 
-   development platform, because we need tools like a compiler, linker, 
-   text editor, and other development tools to build our system. Get a 
-   modern distro and play with it."
-
 The Base Distro
----------------
 
-Choosing a distro is only hard because of the choice, my 
-advice is to choose a cheap one because once you have learned a bit and 
-then built LFS you will junk it.  I got mine free with a magazine.  However 
-this may help:
+Choosing a distro is only hard because of the choice, my advice is to
+choose a cheap one because once you have learned a bit and then built
+LFS you will junk it. I got mine free with a magazine. However it may
+help to read [5]The Linux Distribution HOWTO.
 
-    http://tldp.org/HOWTO/CD-Distributions-EN-HOWTO/index.html
-
 Learning to use UNIX
---------------------
 
-Unlike Windows, Unix requires you to understand what you are doing to get 
-anything much out of it.  Both Windows and Unix require deep understanding 
-to get the best out of them.  This document is very basic, but will help 
-you if you are coming from Windows, or just starting out understanding 
-computing:
+Unlike Windows, Unix requires you to understand what you are doing to
+get anything much out of it. Both Windows and Unix require deep
+understanding to get the best out of them. If you are coming from a
+Windows background or are new to computing in general then reading
+[6]The UNIX and Internet Fundamentals HOWTO is very basic and will
+help.
 
-    http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Unix-and-Internet-Fundamentals-HOWTO/
+Also, [7]Linux Installation and Getting Started , yes, is very dated,
+but is still good and worth a read.
 
-The next one is also good, yes, it's dated, but still worth reading:
-
-    http://tldp.org/LDP/gs/
-
 The Shell
----------
 
-If you have read those, then you are aware that we drive Unix though a 
-shell, which provides the command line interface.  The shell we use in LFS, 
-as in most of the Linux world, is bash (The Bourne Again Shell).  You need 
-to be fluent in using bash, this is a good tutorial:
+If you have read those, then you are aware that we drive Unix though a
+shell, which provides the command line interface. The shell we use in
+LFS, as in most of the Linux world, is bash (The Bourne Again Shell).
+You need to be fluent in using bash, and [8]The Advanced Bash
+Scripting Guide is a good tutorial. (Yes, I know it says 'Advanced',
+but read it anyway, do you want to be a newbie forever?)
 
-    http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/
-
-(Yes, I know it says 'Advanced', but read it anyway, do you want to be a 
-newbie forever?)
-
 Becoming an apprentice guru
----------------------------
 
-Then there are three books that you ought to have available from or on your 
-box for easy reference, skim read them now so you know how to use them:
+Then there are three books that you ought to have available from or on
+your box for easy reference, skim read them now so you know how to use
+them:
 
-The Linux User's Guide.  
+[9]The Linux User's Guide
 
-    http://espc22.murdoch.edu.au/~stewart/guide/guide.html
-    (you can also find this at tldp.org, but not in html)
+[10]The Linux Systems Adminstrator's Guide
 
-The Linux Systems Administrators Guide
+[11]The Linux Network Administrator's Guide, Second Edition
 
-    http://tldp.org/LDP/sag/index.html
+I recommend that you put bookmarks to these in your browser, so that
+you can get to them quickly. It will save lots of time later.
 
-The Linux Network Administrators Guide, Second Edition
-
-    http://tldp.org/LDP/nag2/index.html
-
 On Building from Source
------------------------
 
-Having got yourself a LINUX system, and played a bit, you now will know a 
-little about the subject, but before moving on to the building of LFS you 
-should learn how to build packages from source code.  This is an area 
-where it's hard to find good references.  We suggest this one in the 
-LFS book:
+Having got yourself a LINUX system, and played a bit, you now will
+know a little about the subject, but before moving on to the building
+of Linux from Scratch you should learn how to build packages from
+source code. This is an area where it's hard to find good references.
+The LFS book suggests [12]Building and Installing Software Packages
+for Linux and [13]Autoconf, Automake, and Libtool is good too, if a
+little advanced.
 
-    http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Software-Building-HOWTO.html
+It's very important that you have some experience installing a package
+from source on your distro before attempting LFS.
 
-And this is good too:
+One good choice would be [14]GNU-Emacs. Here's what to do:
+ 1. check out it's homepage
+ 2. download a source distribution as a gzipped tar file
+ 3. unpack the source with tar and gunzip
+ 4. read the README file
+ 5. read the INSTALL file
+ 6. build it from scratch
 
-    http://sources.redhat.com/autobook/autobook/autobook_toc.html
+In doing this you will not only learn how to obtain and build a
+package from scratch, you'll also prove that you have installed the
+right tools for your distribution.
 
-It's very important that you have some experience installing a 
-package from source on your distro before attempting LFS.
-  
-One good choice would be GNU-emacs.  Check out it's homepage at:
+If you want a real challenge, try [15]MPlayer. This package is a good
+test of your developing skills, as you will need to track down and
+install all it's dependencies first. (You could also cheat and look at
+the [16]Beyond Linux From Scratch book for a hint.)
 
-    http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs.html
+IBM, once Big Bad Blue, is now a great supporter of OpenSource and
+Linux. They have some free tutorials on their [17]developerWorks
+website.
 
-Another, suggested by others, is mplayer.  This is a good 
-challenge and a test of your developing skills.  Mplayer's home website is 
-at:
+Like most Large Multi-nationals, IBM change their site around
+regularly, so any link I give to the tutorials may not be valid any
+more. Follow links to Technical Library and Tutorials though, and you
+should find:
+  * Compiling and installing software from sources
+  * Compiling the Linux kernel
+  * Using regular expressions
 
-    http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/
+but there are rich pickings here, even for the experienced.
 
-IBM, once Big Bad Blue, is now a great supporter of OpenSource and Linux.  
-They have some free tutorials on their website:
+Bootstraping
 
-    http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/
+One area where even seasoned UNIX veterans seem to have trouble is
+with setting up the bootstrap for the new LFS system. Often these
+problems come from not reading the available documents.
 
-Look for the 'Tutorials' link (currently top right) and look especially 
-for the following:
+Most people will be building for an X86 platform. Before LFS-5.0 we
+used Lilo as our recommended BootLoader, from LFS-5.0 we use GRUB.
+There is little to choose between the two, and they are not the only
+choices either. However, it is important to take time to familiarise
+yourself with the bootloader that you plan to use.
 
-  Compiling and installing software from sources
-  Compiling the Linux kernel
-  Using regular expressions
+Check out the homepages for the bootloader (lilo's is not very
+impressive):
 
-but there are rich pickings here, even for the experienced.
+[18]Grub
 
-Bootstraping
-------------
+[19]Lilo
 
-One area where even seasoned UNIX veterans seem to have trouble is with
-setting up the bootstrap for the new LFS system.  Often these
-problems come from not reading the available documents.
+And the various HOWTO's, not all will be relevant for you:
 
-Most people will be building for an X86 platform. Before LFS-5.0 we used
-Lilo as our recommended BootLoader, from LFS-5.0 we use GRUB. There is
-little to choose between the two, and they are not the only choices
-either. However, it is important to take time to familiarise yourself
-with the bootloader that you plan to use.
+[20]The Lilo mini-HOWTO
 
-Check out the homepages for the bootloader (lilo's is not very impressive):
+[21]Boot + Root + Raid + Lilo : Software Raid mini-HOWTO
 
-    http://www.gnu.org/software/grub
-    http://lilo.go.dyndns.org/
+[22]Linux+WindowsNT mini-HOWTO
 
-And the various HOWTO's, not all will be relevant for you:
+[23]Win95 + WinNT + Linux multiboot using LILO mini-HOWTO
 
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/LILO.html
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Boot+Root+Raid+LILO.html
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+WinNT.html
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Multiboot-with-LILO.html
+[24]Linux+Win9x+Grub HOWTO
 
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+Win9x+Grub-HOWTO/
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Multiboot-with-GRUB.html
+[25]Multiboot with GRUB Mini-HOWTO
 
 If you are building for a non-X86 platform you will have to research
 your own bootloader, try a google for whatever bootstrap is used by
 your base distro, but these links may help:
 
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/PA-RISC-Linux-Boot-HOWTO/index.html
-    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/SRM-HOWTO/index.html
-    http://www.sparc-boot.org/
+[26]PA-RISC/Linux Boot HOWTO
 
-But the most important thing you can do is to read the man and info pages
-for the bootloader.  A print (on paper) of the error codes can be very
-helpful (as the online docs will not be available when you need this
-info), and it is vital that you have an alternative means of booting your
-system before testing your new bootloader.
+[27]SRM Firmware Howto
 
+[28]The Sparc Improved boot LOader
 
-Part 3.  Other stuff.
----------------------
+But the most important thing you can do is to read the man and info
+pages for the bootloader. A print (on paper) of the error codes can be
+very helpful (as the online docs will not be available just when you
+need this info), and it is vital that you have an alternative means of
+booting your system before testing your new bootloader.
 
-My starting point for any query or gap in my knowledge is google, yours 
-should be too.  Go to the google page, and hit the advanced search button.  
-Learn the full capabilities of this essential tool, spend at least a whole 
-day on this.  Truely, you can't live without it.
+Part 3. Other stuff.
 
-    http://www.google.com
+My starting point for any query or gap in my knowledge is google,
+yours should be too. Go to the [29]Google page, and hit the advanced
+search button. Learn the full capabilities of this essential tool,
+spend at least a whole day on this. Truely, you can't live without it.
 
 Note that if US English isn't your native tongue, then google has many
-national versions.  I use http://www.google.co.uk, as I'm English, and find
-this version more colourful.
+national versions. I use [30]Google UK, as I'm English, and find this
+version more colourful.
 
-There is a whole heap of documentation at the Linux Documentation Project, 
-some of which I've quoted above.  Learn to go there regularly and just poke 
-about, it's a great storehouse of knowledge.  Beware though a lot of it is 
-out of date.
+There is a whole heap of documentation at the [31]Linux Documentation
+Project, some of which I've quoted above. Learn to go there regularly
+and just poke about, it's a great storehouse of knowledge. Beware
+though a lot of it is out of date.
 
-   http://tldp.org/
+You might want to find some other software for your Linux box. The
+place to search is: [32]Freshmeat
 
-You might want to find some other software for your Linux box.  The 
-place to search is:
+LFS has it's own search system on the website. You can use it to find
+answers to obscure questions that others have asked in the distant
+past, as well as 'where is' type inquiries. Look on the LFS website
+homepage.
 
-   http://freshmeat.net/
+And finally, whatever you read or don't read concerning LFS, before
+asking questions, start by reading the FAQ. FAQ stands for 'Frequently
+Asked Questions'. We don't want to answer them again, so don't ask
+them. Read [33]The LFS FAQ
 
-LFS has it's own search system on the website.  You can use it to find answers
-to obscure questions that others have asked in the distant past, as well as
-'where is' type inquiries.  Look on the LFS website homepage.
+ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: I have received encouragement and advice from the
+following, but the words are my fault alone: Dagmar D'Surreal, Tushar
+Teredesai, Ken Dyke, James Robertson, Eric Miller, and lots of others
+on lfs-chat. But nothing would have been done at all without the LFS
+project that Gerard Beekmans started: [34]Linux from Scratch
 
-And finally, whatever you read or don't read concerning LFS, before 
-asking questions, start by reading the FAQ.  FAQ stands for 'Frequently 
-Asked Questions'.  We don't want to answer them again, so don't ask them.  
-Read the FAQ.
+CHANGELOG:
 
-    http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/faq/
+[2002-12-31]
+ Initial version in old hints format.
 
-ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
+[2003-09-29]
+ Revision into new LFS hints format, minor changes and
+ reproofing of links.
 
-I have received encouragement and advice from the following, but the words 
-are my fault alone.
-Dagmar D'Surreal, Tushar Teredesai, Ken Dyke, James Robertson, Eric Miller, 
-and lots of others on lfs-chat.
-But nothing would have been done at all without the LFS project 
-that Gerard Beekmans started:  www.linuxfromscratch.org
+[2003-12-14]
+ Convertion to XHTML for easy on-line use
 
-CHANGELOG:
-[2002-12-31]
-  * Initial version in old hints format.
-[2003-09-29]
-  * Revision into this format, minor changes and reproofing of links.
-[2004-01-11]
-  * Revision to point at the on-line version.
-  
+[2004-12-14]
+ Revalidated many of the hyperlinks
+
+[2004-12-28]
+ Revised the online version and it's CSS stylesheet to correctly
+ generate an LFS Hint with lynx -dump. No significant content
+ changes. Changed license to Creative Commons.
+
+© Richard A Downing FBCS 2003, 2004
+
+[35]Creative Commons License [36]Valid XHTML 1.1! [37]Valid CSS!
+
+References
+
+1. http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
+2. http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
+3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zazen
+4. http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/faq/
+5. http://tldp.org/HOWTO/CD-Distributions-EN-HOWTO/index.html
+6. http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Unix-and-Internet-Fundamentals-HOWTO/
+7. http://tldp.org/LDP/gs/
+8. http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/
+9. http://espc22.murdoch.edu.au/~stewart/guide/guide.html
+  10. http://tldp.org/LDP/sag/index.html
+  11. http://tldp.org/LDP/nag2/index.html
+  12. http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Software-Building-HOWTO.html
+  13. http://sources.redhat.com/autobook/autobook/autobook_toc.html
+  14. http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs.html
+  15. http://www.mplayerhq.hu/homepage/
+  16. http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs
+  17. http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/
+  18. http://www.gnu.org/software/grub
+  19. http://lilo.go.dyndns.org/
+  20. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/LILO.html
+  21. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Boot+Root+Raid+LILO.html
+  22. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+WinNT.html
+  23. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Multiboot-with-LILO.html
+  24. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+Win9x+Grub-HOWTO/
+  25. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Multiboot-with-GRUB.html
+  26. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/PA-RISC-Linux-Boot-HOWTO/index.html
+  27. http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/SRM-HOWTO/index.html
+  28. http://www.sparc-boot.org/
+  29. http://www.google.com/
+  30. http://www.google.co.uk/
+  31. http://tldp.org/
+  32. http://freshmeat.net/
+  33. http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/faq/
+  34. http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
+  35. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/
+  36. http://validator.w3.org/check?uri=referer
+  37. http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator




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