cvs commit: LFS/BOOK/preface foreword.xml whoread.xml

gerard at linuxfromscratch.org gerard at linuxfromscratch.org
Wed May 29 04:08:17 PDT 2002


gerard      02/05/29 04:08:17

  Modified:    BOOK     index.xml
               BOOK/chapter03 ncurses-patch.xml
               BOOK/preface foreword.xml whoread.xml
  Log:
  Applied Scot's LFS-BOOK-CVS-2002-05-28-XML.patch patch to foreword.xml and whoread.xml
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.428     +2 -2      LFS/BOOK/index.xml
  
  Index: index.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/index.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.427
  retrieving revision 1.428
  diff -u -r1.427 -r1.428
  --- index.xml	28 May 2002 14:17:20 -0000	1.427
  +++ index.xml	29 May 2002 11:08:16 -0000	1.428
  @@ -4,8 +4,8 @@
   
   <!ENTITY book SYSTEM "book/book.xml">
   
  -<!ENTITY version "20020528">
  -<!ENTITY releasedate "May 28th, 2002">
  +<!ENTITY version "20020529">
  +<!ENTITY releasedate "May 29th, 2002">
   
   <!ENTITY ftp-root "ftp://ftp.linuxfromscratch.org">
   <!ENTITY http-root "http://ftp.linuxfromscratch.org">
  
  
  
  1.8       +2 -2      LFS/BOOK/chapter03/ncurses-patch.xml
  
  Index: ncurses-patch.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter03/ncurses-patch.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.7
  retrieving revision 1.8
  diff -u -r1.7 -r1.8
  --- ncurses-patch.xml	27 May 2002 03:17:48 -0000	1.7
  +++ ncurses-patch.xml	29 May 2002 11:08:16 -0000	1.8
  @@ -1,3 +1,3 @@
   Ncurses Patch (&ncurses-version;) - &ncurses-patch-size;:
  -<ulink url="&ftp;/ncurses-&ncurses-version;.patch.bz2"/>
  -<ulink url="&http;/ncurses-&ncurses-version;.patch.bz2"/>
  +<ulink url="&ftp;/ncurses-&ncurses-patch-version;.patch.bz2"/>
  +<ulink url="&http;/ncurses-&ncurses-patch-version;.patch.bz2"/>
  
  
  
  1.5       +12 -12    LFS/BOOK/preface/foreword.xml
  
  Index: foreword.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/foreword.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- foreword.xml	25 Sep 2001 23:03:59 -0000	1.4
  +++ foreword.xml	29 May 2002 11:08:16 -0000	1.5
  @@ -3,20 +3,20 @@
   <?dbhtml filename="foreword.html" dir="preface"?>
   
   <para>Having used a number of different Linux distributions, I was never fully
  -satisfied with any of them. I didn't like the way the bootscripts were
  -arranged, I didn't like the way certain programs were configured by
  -default, and more of those things. I came to realize that if I wanted to
  -be fully satisfied with a Linux system, I would have to build my own system 
  -from scratch, ideally using only the source code. Not using 
  -pre-compiled packages of any kind. No help from some sort of CD-ROM or 
  +satisfied with any of them. I didn't like the way the arrangement of the
  +bootscripts. I didn't like the way certain programs were configured by
  +default. Much more of that sort of thing bothered me. Finally I realized that
  +if I wanted full satisfisfaction from my Linux system I would have to build
  +my own system from scratch, using only the source code. I resolved not to use 
  +pre-compiled packages of any kind, nor CD-ROM or 
   bootdisk that would install some basic utilities. I would use my current 
  -Linux system and use that one to build my own.</para>
  +Linux system to develop my own.</para>
   
  -<para>This, at one time, wild idea seemed very difficult and at times almost
  -impossible. After sorting out all kinds of dependency problems, compile
  -problems, etcetera, a custom-built Linux system was created and fully 
  -operational. I called this system an LFS system, which stands for Linux 
  -From Scratch.</para>
  +<para>This wild idea seemed very difficult at the time and often seemed
  +an impossible task. After sorting out all kinds of problems, such as
  +dependencies and compile-time errors, a custom-built Linux system was
  +created that was fully operational. I called this system a Linux From Scratch
  +system, or LFS for short.</para>
   
   <para>I hope all of you will have a great time working on LFS!</para>
   
  
  
  
  1.16      +42 -45    LFS/BOOK/preface/whoread.xml
  
  Index: whoread.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/whoread.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.15
  retrieving revision 1.16
  diff -u -r1.15 -r1.16
  --- whoread.xml	29 Jan 2002 16:54:27 -0000	1.15
  +++ whoread.xml	29 May 2002 11:08:16 -0000	1.16
  @@ -2,57 +2,54 @@
   <title>Who would want to read this book</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="whoread.html" dir="preface"?>
   
  -<para>There are a lot of reasons why somebody would want to read this 
  -book in order to install an LFS system. The question most people raise 
  -is "why go through all the hassle of manually installing a Linux system 
  -from scratch when you can just download an existing distribution?". That is
  -a valid question which I hope to answer for you.</para>
  -
  -<para>The most important reason for LFS's existence is teaching people 
  -how a Linux system works internally. Building an LFS system teaches you 
  -about all that makes Linux tick, how things work together, and depend on 
  -each other. And most importantly, how to customize it to your own taste 
  -and needs.</para>
  -
  -<para>One of the key benefits of LFS is that you are in control of
  -your system without having to rely on somebody else's Linux 
  -implementation. You are in the driver's seat now and are 
  -able to dictate every single thing such as the directory layout and boot 
  -script setup. You will also know exactly where, why and how programs 
  -are installed.</para>
  -
  -<para>Another benefit of LFS is that you can create a very compact Linux
  -system. When you install a regular distribution, you end
  -up installing a lot of programs you probably would never use.
  -They're just sitting there taking up (precious) disk space. It's not
  -hard to get an LFS system installed under 100 MB. Does that still sound
  -like a lot? A few of us have been working on creating a very small
  -embedded LFS system. We installed a system that was just enough to run
  -the Apache web server; total disk space usage was approximately 8 MB.
  -With further stripping, that can be brought down to 5 MB or less. Try
  -that with a regular distribution.</para>
  -
  -<para>If we were to compare a Linux distribution with a hamburger you 
  -buy at a supermarket or fast-food restaurant, you would end up eating it 
  -without knowing precisely what it is you are eating, whereas LFS gives 
  -you the ingredients to make a hamburger. This allows you to carefully 
  -inspect it, remove unwanted ingredients, and at the same time allow you 
  -to add ingredients to enhance the flavour of your hamburger. When you are
  -satisfied with the ingredients, you go on to the next part of putting it
  -together. You now have the chance to make it just the way you like it:
  -broil it, bake it, deep-fry it, barbeque it, or eat it raw.</para>
  +<para>There are many reasons why somebody would want to read this book. The
  +principle reason being to install a LFS system. A question many people raise 
  +is "Why go through all the hassle of manually building a Linux system 
  +from scratch when you can just download and install an  existing one?". That
  +is a good question.</para>
  +
  +<para>One important reason for LFS's existence is helping people 
  +learn how a Linux system works from the inside out. Building a LFS system
  +helps demonstrate what makes Linux tick, and how things work together and
  +depend on each other. And perhaps most importantly, how to customize it to
  +your own tastes and needs.</para>
  +
  +<para>A key benefit of LFS is that you have more control of your system
  +without relying on someone else's Linux implementation. With LFS, you are
  +in the driver's seat and dictate every aspect of your system, such as the
  +directory layout and boot script setup. You also dictate where, why and how
  +programs are installed.</para>
  +
  +<para>Another benefit of LFS is the ability to create a very compact Linux
  +system. When installing a regular distribution, you end up with a lot of
  +programs you likely will never use. They're just sitting there wasting
  +(precious) disk space. It isn't difficult to build LFS systems of under
  +100 MB. Does that still sound like a lot? A few of us have been working on
  +creating a very small embedded LFS system. We successfully built a system
  +that was just enough to run the Apache web server with approximately 8MB
  +of disk space used. Further stripping could bring that down to 5 MB or
  +less. Try that with a regular distribution.</para>
  +
  +<para>We could compare distributed Linux to a hamburger you buy at a
  +fast-food restaurant. You have no idea what you are easting. LFS on the
  +other hand, doesn't give you a hamburger, but the recipe to make a hamburger.
  +This allows you to inspect it, omit unwanted ingredients, and allows you to
  +add your own ingredients that enhance the flavour of your burger. When you
  +are satisfied with the recipe, you go on to preparing it. You make it just
  +the way you like it: broil it, bake it, deep-fry it, barbeque it, or eat it
  +raw.</para>
   
   <para>Another analogy that we can use is that of comparing LFS with a 
   finished house. LFS will give you the skeleton of a house, but it's up 
   to you to install plumbing, electrical outlets, kitchen, bathtub, 
   wallpaper, etc.</para>
   
  -<para>Another advantage of a custom built Linux system is added security. 
  -You will compile the entire system from source, thus allowing you to audit
  -everything, if you wish to do so, and apply all the security patches you
  -want or need to apply. You don't have to wait for somebody else to
  -provide a new binary package that fixes a security hole. Besides, you
  -have no guarantee that the new package actually fixes the problem
  +<para>Another advantage of a custom built Linux system is security. 
  +By compiling the entire system from source code, you are empowered to audit
  +everything and apply all the security patches you feel are needed. You don't 
  +have to wait for somebody else to compile binary packages that fix a security
  +hole. Examine the new patch and build it yourself.  You have no guarantee 
  +that the new package was built correctly and actually fixes the problem
   (adequately). You never truly know whether a security hole is fixed or
   not unless you do it yourself.</para>
   
  
  
  
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