cvs commit: LFS/BOOK/preface foreword.xml organpart1.xml organpart2.xml organpart3.xml whoread.xml

gerard at linuxfromscratch.org gerard at linuxfromscratch.org
Fri May 31 05:03:05 PDT 2002


gerard      02/05/31 05:03:05

  Modified:    BOOK/chapter01 alfsdiscuss.xml blfsbook.xml blfsdev.xml
                        blfssupport.xml faq.xml how.xml
               BOOK/preface foreword.xml organpart1.xml organpart2.xml
                        organpart3.xml whoread.xml
  Log:
  applied Scot's LFS-BOOK-CVS-20020530-XML.patch
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.6       +4 -5      LFS/BOOK/chapter01/alfsdiscuss.xml
  
  Index: alfsdiscuss.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter01/alfsdiscuss.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.5
  retrieving revision 1.6
  diff -u -r1.5 -r1.6
  --- alfsdiscuss.xml	7 Nov 2001 15:42:16 -0000	1.5
  +++ alfsdiscuss.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.6
  @@ -1,11 +1,10 @@
   <sect2>
   <title>alfs-discuss</title>
   
  -<para>The alfs-discuss list discusses the development of ALFS, which stands for
  -Automated Linux From Scratch. The goal of this project is to develop an
  -installation tool that can install an LFS system automatically.
  -Its main goal is to speed up compilation by taking away the need to
  -manually enter the commands to configure, compile, and install packages.</para>
  +<para>The alfs-discuss list discusses the development of ALFS, which is short
  +for Automated Linux From Scratch. The goal of this project is to develop an
  +installation tool that installs an LFS system automatically, thus speeding
  +up compilation by taking away the need to manually enter the commands.</para>
   
   </sect2>
   
  
  
  
  1.3       +3 -3      LFS/BOOK/chapter01/blfsbook.xml
  
  Index: blfsbook.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter01/blfsbook.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- blfsbook.xml	21 Sep 2001 19:46:27 -0000	1.2
  +++ blfsbook.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.3
  @@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
   <sect2>
   <title>blfs-book</title>
   
  -<para>The blfs-book list is used by the BLFS-BOOK editors 
  -to co-ordinate blfs-book's maintenance, like XML issues and the like. 
  -Actual discussion on what should be added and removed should take place 
  +<para>The blfs-book list is used by the BLFS-BOOK editors to co-ordinate
  +the maintenance of the BLFS book, such as XML source code issues and the
  +like. Actual discussion on what should be added and removed should take place 
   on blfs-dev.</para>
   
   </sect2>
  
  
  
  1.2       +5 -8      LFS/BOOK/chapter01/blfsdev.xml
  
  Index: blfsdev.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter01/blfsdev.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.1
  retrieving revision 1.2
  diff -u -r1.1 -r1.2
  --- blfsdev.xml	21 Sep 2001 19:46:27 -0000	1.1
  +++ blfsdev.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.2
  @@ -1,15 +1,12 @@
   <sect2>
   <title>blfs-dev</title>
   
  -<para>The blfs-dev mailing list discusses matters related to the
  -BLFS-BOOK (Beyond LFS).  If problems with the book come up, a bug 
  -or two need to be
  -reported, or suggestions to improve the book (such as suggestions as to
  -installation instructions to add) are to be made, this mailing list 
  -is the right one.</para>
  +<para>The blfs-dev mailing list discusses development of the
  +BLFS-BOOK (Beyond LFS). This is the maillist to submit bug reports,
  +and make suggestions to improve the BLFS book.</para>
   
  -<para>Requests for help with programs beyond the base LFS setup (not
  -just those in BLFS) should go to blfs-support.</para>
  +<para>Requests for help with programs beyond the base LFS build and setup
  +(not just those in the BLFS book) should be made in blfs-support.</para>
   
   </sect2>
   
  
  
  
  1.2       +2 -3      LFS/BOOK/chapter01/blfssupport.xml
  
  Index: blfssupport.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter01/blfssupport.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.1
  retrieving revision 1.2
  diff -u -r1.1 -r1.2
  --- blfssupport.xml	21 Sep 2001 19:46:27 -0000	1.1
  +++ blfssupport.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.2
  @@ -1,9 +1,8 @@
   <sect2>
   <title>blfs-support</title>
   
  -<para>The blfs-support list deals with support requests for any software
  -not installed in the LFS book.  The list is not just for help with
  -software explicitly mentioned in the BLFS book, any software beyond that
  +<para>The blfs-support list handles support requests for any software
  +that is not built or installed in the LFS book.  Any software beyond what is
   installed as part of the base LFS system can be discussed here.</para>
   
   </sect2>
  
  
  
  1.3       +1 -1      LFS/BOOK/chapter01/faq.xml
  
  Index: faq.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter01/faq.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- faq.xml	11 May 2002 13:26:18 -0000	1.2
  +++ faq.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.3
  @@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
   <title>FAQ</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="faq.html" dir="chapter01"?>
   
  -<para>If you encounter any problems building an LFS system, you should
  +<para>If you encounter any problems while building an LFS system, you should
   check out <ulink url="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/faq/"/> to see if 
   your question is already answered in the FAQ.</para>
   
  
  
  
  1.15      +52 -34    LFS/BOOK/chapter01/how.xml
  
  Index: how.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter01/how.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.14
  retrieving revision 1.15
  diff -u -r1.14 -r1.15
  --- how.xml	16 May 2002 18:40:04 -0000	1.14
  +++ how.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.15
  @@ -2,47 +2,65 @@
   <title>How things are going to be done</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="how.html" dir="chapter01"?>
   
  -<para>We are going to build the LFS system by using an already installed Linux
  -distribution such as Debian, SuSe, Slackware, Mandrake, RedHat, etc. There
  -is no need to have any kind of bootdisk. We will use an existing Linux
  -system as the base (since we need a compiler, linker, text editor, and
  -other tools).</para>
  +<para>We are going to build the LFS system by using a previously installed
  +Linux distribution such as Debian, SuSe, Slackware, Mandrake, RedHat, etc.
  +We will use the existing Linux system as the development platform, because
  +we need tools like a compiler, linker, text editor, and other necessary
  +development tools to build our system. Ordinarily, the required tools are
  +available by default if we selected "development" as one of our installation
  +options when we installed the distributed Linux.</para>
   
   <para>After you have downloaded the necessary packages that make up an LFS
  -system you will create a new Linux native partition onto which the LFS system
  -will be installed.</para>
  +system we will create a new Linux native partition and filesystem. Here
  +is where the LFS system will be compiled and installed.</para>
   
  -<para>The next step, chapter 5, will be the installation of a number of
  -packages that are statically linked and installed on the LFS partition.
  -These packages form a basic development suite which will be used to
  -install the actual system, and are also needed to resolve circular
  -dependencies. Examples of circular dependencies are: you need a compiler 
  -to install a compiler. You need a shell in order to install a shell. And
  -so on.</para>
  -
  -<para>Chapter 6 installs the actual base system. We use the chroot program 
  -to start a new shell whose root directory will be set to the LFS
  -partition. This, in essence, is the same as rebooting and having the
  -kernel mount the LFS partition as the root partition. The reason that
  -we don't actually reboot, but instead chroot, is that this way you can
  -still use your host system. While software is being installed you can
  -simply switch to a different VC (Virtual Console) or X desktop and
  -continue using your computer as you normally would.</para>
  -
  -<para>When all the software is installed, chapter 7 will set up the boot
  -scripts. Chapter 8 will set up the Linux boot loader and in chapter 9
  -there are some pointers what you can do after you finish the book. Then
  -you can finally reboot your system into your new LFS system, and start
  -to really use it.</para>
  +<para>The next step, chapter 5, will discuss the installation of a number of
  +packages that will form a basic development suite that is used to
  +build the actual system, or needed to resolve circular dependencies. For
  +example, you need a compiler to build a new compiler, and you need a shell
  +in order to install a new shell. The packages in this chapter will be linked
  +statically. Static linking describes a method of compiling software so that
  +it does not require the presence of libraries when building is complete.
  +The resulting program is able to function on its own. The program is able to
  +do so because the pieces of the program that would normally remain in the
  +libraries are copied from the libraries and built right into the program.
  +Ordinarily software is built with dynamic linking. This conserves storage
  +space and increases the efficiency of many programs. We statically link
  +our software in chapter 5 because we will in theory be moving our
  +development system to a virtual environment where the already mentioned
  +libraries will be absent. If the software is built dynamically, our
  +development suite will not function. Since the libraries we are talking
  +about are provided by our distribution Linux, the goal of chapter 5 is to
  +build a development environment where those libraries are not required
  +and is therefore independent of the distribution.</para>
  +
  +<para>In chapter 6 we will build and install our final system. We will use
  +the chroot program to enter a virtual environment and start a new shell
  +whose root directory will be set to the partition where we built all the
  +chapter 5 software. This is very similar to rebooting and instructing the
  +kernel to mount our LFS partition as the root partition. The reason that
  +we don't actually reboot, but instead chroot, is that creating a static
  +system that we can boot into requires more work that simply isn't necessary.
  +As well, we can continue to use our platform system while we are building
  +LFS. While software is being compiled and installed you can simply switch
  +to a different VC (Virtual Console) or X desktop and continue using your
  +computer normally.</para>
  +
  +<para>When all the software from chapter 6 is installed, chapters 7,8 and 9
  +will help us finalize our installation. We will set up our boot
  +scripts in chapter 7. In chapter 8 we will build our final linux kernel and
  +set up the Linux boot loader. Chapter 9 has some pointers to help you after
  +you finish the book. Then finally, you reboot your system and boot into your
  +new LFS system, and start to really use it.</para>
   
   <para>This is the process in a nutshell. Detailed information on the steps
  -you are taking are provided in the chapters as you go through them. If
  -something isn't completely clear yet, don't worry. It will become very
  -clear shortly.</para>
  +we will take are discussed in the chapters and package descriptions as you
  +progress through them. If something isn't completely clear now, don't worry.
  +It should become very clear shortly.</para>
   
   <para>Please read chapter 2 carefully as it explains a few important things
  -you need to be aware of before you work your way through chapters 5 and
  -above.</para>
  +you should be aware of before you begin to work through chapters 5 and
  +later.</para>
   
   </sect1>
   
  
  
  
  1.6       +9 -9      LFS/BOOK/preface/foreword.xml
  
  Index: foreword.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/foreword.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.5
  retrieving revision 1.6
  diff -u -r1.5 -r1.6
  --- foreword.xml	29 May 2002 11:08:16 -0000	1.5
  +++ foreword.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.6
  @@ -2,15 +2,15 @@
   <title>Foreword</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="foreword.html" dir="preface"?>
   
  -<para>Having used a number of different Linux distributions, I was never fully
  -satisfied with any of them. I didn't like the way the arrangement of the
  -bootscripts. I didn't like the way certain programs were configured by
  -default. Much more of that sort of thing bothered me. Finally I realized that
  -if I wanted full satisfisfaction from my Linux system I would have to build
  -my own system from scratch, using only the source code. I resolved not to use 
  -pre-compiled packages of any kind, nor CD-ROM or 
  -bootdisk that would install some basic utilities. I would use my current 
  -Linux system to develop my own.</para>
  +<para>Having used a number of different Linux distributions, I was never
  +fully satisfied with any of them. I didn't like the way the arrangement of
  +the bootscripts. I didn't like the way certain programs were configured by
  +default. Much more of that sort of thing bothered me. Finally I realized
  +that if I wanted full satisfisfaction from my Linux system I would have to
  +build my own system from scratch, using only the source code. I resolved
  +not to use pre-compiled packages of any kind, nor CD-ROM or bootdisk that
  +would install some basic utilities. I would use my current Linux system to
  +develop my own.</para>
   
   <para>This wild idea seemed very difficult at the time and often seemed
   an impossible task. After sorting out all kinds of problems, such as
  
  
  
  1.7       +5 -4      LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart1.xml
  
  Index: organpart1.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart1.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.6
  retrieving revision 1.7
  diff -u -r1.6 -r1.7
  --- organpart1.xml	22 Jul 2001 19:02:31 -0000	1.6
  +++ organpart1.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.7
  @@ -1,10 +1,11 @@
   <sect2 id="pre-organ1">
   <title>Part I - Introduction</title>
   
  -<para>Part One gives general information about this book (versions, where
  -to get it, changelog, mailing lists, and how to get in touch with us).
  -It also explains a few important aspects you really want and need to
  -read before starting to build an LFS system.</para>
  +<para>Part I gives general information about the contents of book
  +(revisions, where to get it, changelog, mailing lists, and other contact
  +information). It also contains suggested reading that discusses a few
  +important considerations to think about before beginning your LFS
  +system.</para>
   
   </sect2>
   
  
  
  
  1.7       +6 -5      LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart2.xml
  
  Index: organpart2.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart2.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.6
  retrieving revision 1.7
  diff -u -r1.6 -r1.7
  --- organpart2.xml	6 Sep 2001 19:54:34 -0000	1.6
  +++ organpart2.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.7
  @@ -1,10 +1,11 @@
   <sect2 id="pre-organ2">
  -<title>Part II - Installation of the LFS system</title>
  +<title>Part II - Installation of the base LFS system</title>
   
  -<para>Part Two guides you through the installation of the LFS system which will 
  -be the foundation for the rest of the system. Whatever you choose to do 
  -with your brand new LFS system, it will be built on the foundation 
  -that's installed in this part.</para>
  +<para>Part II guides you through the building and installation of an LFS
  +system. The finished LFS system will be the core foundation that the rest
  +of your Linux system will be built on. What you choose to do with your brand
  +new LFS system will be built and supported by this foundation that we build
  +in Part II.</para>
   
   </sect2>
   
  
  
  
  1.4       +1 -1      LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart3.xml
  
  Index: organpart3.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart3.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.3
  retrieving revision 1.4
  diff -u -r1.3 -r1.4
  --- organpart3.xml	22 Jul 2001 19:02:46 -0000	1.3
  +++ organpart3.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.4
  @@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
   <sect2 id="pre-organ3">
   <title>Part III - Appendixes</title>
   
  -<para>Part Three contains various Appendices.</para>
  +<para>Part III contains various Appendices.</para>
   
   </sect2>
   
  
  
  
  1.17      +11 -12    LFS/BOOK/preface/whoread.xml
  
  Index: whoread.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/whoread.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.16
  retrieving revision 1.17
  diff -u -r1.16 -r1.17
  --- whoread.xml	29 May 2002 11:08:16 -0000	1.16
  +++ whoread.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.17
  @@ -3,13 +3,13 @@
   <?dbhtml filename="whoread.html" dir="preface"?>
   
   <para>There are many reasons why somebody would want to read this book. The
  -principle reason being to install a LFS system. A question many people raise 
  +principle reason being to install an LFS system. A question many people raise 
   is "Why go through all the hassle of manually building a Linux system 
  -from scratch when you can just download and install an  existing one?". That
  +from scratch when you can just download and install an existing one?". That
   is a good question.</para>
   
   <para>One important reason for LFS's existence is helping people 
  -learn how a Linux system works from the inside out. Building a LFS system
  +learn how a Linux system works from the inside out. Building an LFS system
   helps demonstrate what makes Linux tick, and how things work together and
   depend on each other. And perhaps most importantly, how to customize it to
   your own tastes and needs.</para>
  @@ -32,23 +32,22 @@
   
   <para>We could compare distributed Linux to a hamburger you buy at a
   fast-food restaurant. You have no idea what you are easting. LFS on the
  -other hand, doesn't give you a hamburger, but the recipe to make a hamburger.
  -This allows you to inspect it, omit unwanted ingredients, and allows you to
  -add your own ingredients that enhance the flavour of your burger. When you
  +other hand, doesn't give you a hamburger, but the recipe to make a hamburger. 
  +This allows you to review it, omit unwanted ingredients, and allows you to
  +add your own ingredients that enhance the flavor of your burger. When you
   are satisfied with the recipe, you go on to preparing it. You make it just
   the way you like it: broil it, bake it, deep-fry it, barbeque it, or eat it
  -raw.</para>
  +tar-tar (raw).</para>
   
   <para>Another analogy that we can use is that of comparing LFS with a 
  -finished house. LFS will give you the skeleton of a house, but it's up 
  -to you to install plumbing, electrical outlets, kitchen, bathtub, 
  -wallpaper, etc.</para>
  +finished house. LFS will give you the skeletal plan of a house, but it's up 
  +to you to build it, giving you the freedom to adjust your plans as you go.</para>
   
  -<para>Another advantage of a custom built Linux system is security. 
  +<para>Another advantage of a custom built Linux system is security.
   By compiling the entire system from source code, you are empowered to audit
   everything and apply all the security patches you feel are needed. You don't 
   have to wait for somebody else to compile binary packages that fix a security
  -hole. Examine the new patch and build it yourself.  You have no guarantee 
  +hole. Examine the new patch and build it yourself. You have no guarantee 
   that the new package was built correctly and actually fixes the problem
   (adequately). You never truly know whether a security hole is fixed or
   not unless you do it yourself.</para>
  
  
  
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