cvs commit: LFS/BOOK/preface organization.xml organpart1.xml organpart2.xml whonotread.xml whoread.xml

timothy at linuxfromscratch.org timothy at linuxfromscratch.org
Wed Sep 11 15:22:24 PDT 2002


timothy     02/09/11 15:22:24

  Modified:    BOOK/chapter01 changelog.xml
               BOOK/preface organization.xml organpart1.xml organpart2.xml
                        whonotread.xml whoread.xml
  Log:
  Grammatic changes to the preface.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.359     +3 -0      LFS/BOOK/chapter01/changelog.xml
  
  Index: changelog.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter01/changelog.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.358
  retrieving revision 1.359
  diff -u -r1.358 -r1.359
  --- changelog.xml	8 Sep 2002 21:54:14 -0000	1.358
  +++ changelog.xml	11 Sep 2002 22:22:24 -0000	1.359
  @@ -53,6 +53,9 @@
   </itemizedlist>
   </para></listitem>
   
  +<listitem><para>September 11th, 2002 [timothy]: Preface: Grammatic
  +changes.</para></listitem>
  +
   <listitem><para>September 8th, 2002 [timothy]: Chapter 06: Applied Alex's
   grammar changes patch.</para></listitem>
   
  
  
  
  1.8       +5 -6      LFS/BOOK/preface/organization.xml
  
  Index: organization.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/organization.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.7
  retrieving revision 1.8
  diff -u -r1.7 -r1.8
  --- organization.xml	9 Apr 2002 00:22:06 -0000	1.7
  +++ organization.xml	11 Sep 2002 22:22:24 -0000	1.8
  @@ -2,12 +2,11 @@
   <title>Organization</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="organization.html" dir="preface"?>
   
  -<para>This book is divided into the following parts. Although most of
  -the appendices are copied into part II (which enlarges the book somewhat), 
  -we believe it's the easiest way to read it like this. It simply saves
  -you from having to click to an Appendix, then back to where you were in
  -part II. That's a real chore especially if you're reading the TXT
  -version of this book.</para>
  +<para>Much of the appendices is integrated into Part II (which enlarges the
  +book somewhat). We believe this makes for easier reading. This way, you
  +don't have to keep referencing an Appendix while you read Part II. That's
  +a real chore, especially if you're reading the TXT version of this book.
  +This book is divided into the following parts.</para>
   
   &pf-oz-organpart1;
   &pf-oz-organpart2;
  
  
  
  1.9       +2 -2      LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart1.xml
  
  Index: organpart1.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart1.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.8
  retrieving revision 1.9
  diff -u -r1.8 -r1.9
  --- organpart1.xml	3 Jun 2002 21:33:53 -0000	1.8
  +++ organpart1.xml	11 Sep 2002 22:22:24 -0000	1.9
  @@ -3,8 +3,8 @@
   
   <para>Part I gives general information about the contents of the book
   (revisions, where to get it, changelog, mailing lists, and other contact
  -information). It also contains suggested reading that discusses a few
  -important considerations to think about before beginning your LFS
  +information). It also contains suggested readings which discuss a few
  +important considerations to consider before beginning your LFS
   system.</para>
   
   </sect2>
  
  
  
  1.8       +4 -4      LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart2.xml
  
  Index: organpart2.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/organpart2.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.7
  retrieving revision 1.8
  diff -u -r1.7 -r1.8
  --- organpart2.xml	31 May 2002 12:03:05 -0000	1.7
  +++ organpart2.xml	11 Sep 2002 22:22:24 -0000	1.8
  @@ -2,10 +2,10 @@
   <title>Part II - Installation of the base LFS system</title>
   
   <para>Part II guides you through the building and installation of an LFS
  -system. The finished LFS system will be the core foundation that the rest
  -of your Linux system will be built on. What you choose to do with your brand
  -new LFS system will be built and supported by this foundation that we build
  -in Part II.</para>
  +system. The resulting LFS system will be the core foundation with which
  +the rest of your Linux system is built upon. Whatever your system becomes,
  +it will be built and supported by the foundation that we build in Part
  +II.</para>
   
   </sect2>
   
  
  
  
  1.15      +6 -6      LFS/BOOK/preface/whonotread.xml
  
  Index: whonotread.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/whonotread.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.14
  retrieving revision 1.15
  diff -u -r1.14 -r1.15
  --- whonotread.xml	6 Jun 2002 05:50:29 -0000	1.14
  +++ whonotread.xml	11 Sep 2002 22:22:24 -0000	1.15
  @@ -3,20 +3,20 @@
   <?dbhtml filename="whonotread.html" dir="preface"?>
   
   <para>If you do not wish to build your own Linux system from scratch, then
  -you probably do not want to read this book. Our goal is to build a complete
  +you probably don't want to read this book. Our goal is to build a complete
   and useable foundation system. If you only want to know what happens while
  -your computer boots, then, we recommend the
  -<quote>From-PowerUp-To-Bash-Prompt-HOWTO</quote>. The HOWTO builds a bare
  +your computer boots, then we recommend the
  +<quote>From Power Up To Bash Prompt</quote> HOWTO. The HOWTO builds a bare
   system which is similar to that of this book, but it focuses strictly on
   creating a system capable of booting to a BASH prompt.</para>
   
   <para>While you decide which to read, consider your objective. If you wish
   to build a Linux system while learning a bit along the way, then this book
  -is probably your best choice. If your objective is strictly educational, and
  +is probably your best choice. If your objective is strictly educational and
   you do not have any plans for your finished system, then the
  -From-PowerUp-To-Bash-Prompt-HOWTO is probably a better choice.</para>
  +<quote>From Power Up To Bash Prompt</quote> HOWTO is probably a better choice.</para>
   
  -<para>The <quote>From-PowerUp-To-Bash-Prompt-HOWTO</quote> is located at
  +<para>The <quote>From Power Up To Bash Prompt</quote> HOWTO is located at
   <ulink url="http://www.netspace.net.au/~gok/power2bash/"/>.</para>
   
   </sect1>
  
  
  
  1.19      +12 -11    LFS/BOOK/preface/whoread.xml
  
  Index: whoread.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/preface/whoread.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.18
  retrieving revision 1.19
  diff -u -r1.18 -r1.19
  --- whoread.xml	22 Aug 2002 18:44:40 -0000	1.18
  +++ whoread.xml	11 Sep 2002 22:22:24 -0000	1.19
  @@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
   from scratch when you can just download and install an existing one?". That
   is a good question.</para>
   
  -<para>One important reason for LFS's existence is helping people 
  +<para>One important reason for LFS' existence is to help people
   learn how a Linux system works from the inside out. Building an LFS system
   helps demonstrate what makes Linux tick, and how things work together and
   depend on each other. And perhaps most importantly, how to customize it to
  @@ -21,9 +21,9 @@
   programs are installed.</para>
   
   <para>Another benefit of LFS is the ability to create a very compact Linux
  -system. When installing a regular distribution, you end up with a lot of
  -programs you likely will never use. They're just sitting there wasting
  -(precious) disk space. It isn't difficult to build LFS systems of under
  +system. When installing a regular distribution, you end up with several
  +programs which you are likely to never use. They're just sitting there wasting
  +(precious) disk space. It isn't difficult to build an LFS system less than
   100 MB. Does that still sound like a lot? A few of us have been working on
   creating a very small embedded LFS system. We successfully built a system
   that was just enough to run the Apache web server with approximately 8MB
  @@ -33,24 +33,25 @@
   <para>We could compare distributed Linux to a hamburger you buy at a
   fast-food restaurant, you have no idea what you are eating. LFS on the
   other hand, doesn't give you a hamburger, but the recipe to make a hamburger. 
  -This allows you to review it, omit unwanted ingredients, and allows you to
  -add your own ingredients that enhance the flavor of your burger. When you
  +This allows you to review it, to omit unwanted ingredients, and to
  +add your own ingredients which enhance the flavor of your burger. When you
   are satisfied with the recipe, you go on to preparing it. You make it just
   the way you like it: broil it, bake it, deep-fry it, barbeque it, or eat it
   tar-tar (raw).</para>
   
   <para>Another analogy that we can use is that of comparing LFS with a 
   finished house. LFS will give you the skeletal plan of a house, but it's up 
  -to you to build it, giving you the freedom to adjust your plans as you go.</para>
  +to you to build it. You have the freedom to adjust your plans as you
  +go.</para>
   
   <para>Another advantage of a custom built Linux system is security.
   By compiling the entire system from source code, you are empowered to audit
   everything and apply all the security patches you feel are needed. You don't 
   have to wait for somebody else to compile binary packages that fix a security
  -hole. Examine the new patch and build it yourself. You have no guarantee 
  -that the new package was built correctly and actually fixes the problem
  -(adequately). You never truly know whether a security hole is fixed or
  -not unless you do it yourself.</para>
  +hole. Unless you examine the patch and build it yourself you have no
  +guarantee that the new package was built correctly and actually fixes the
  +problem (adequately). You never truly know whether a security hole is fixed
  +or not unless you do it yourself.</para>
   
   </sect1>
   
  
  
  
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