cvs commit: LFS/BOOK/chapter02 aboutlfs.xml aboutsbus.xml askforhelp.xml download.xml install.xml platform.xml

timothy at linuxfromscratch.org timothy at linuxfromscratch.org
Sat Sep 21 20:01:40 PDT 2002


timothy     02/09/21 20:01:40

  Modified:    BOOK/chapter02 aboutlfs.xml aboutsbus.xml askforhelp.xml
                        download.xml install.xml platform.xml
  Log:
  Applied Bill Maltby's grammatic-fixes patch.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.16      +6 -3      LFS/BOOK/chapter02/aboutlfs.xml
  
  Index: aboutlfs.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter02/aboutlfs.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.15
  retrieving revision 1.16
  diff -u -r1.15 -r1.16
  --- aboutlfs.xml	20 Sep 2002 21:11:27 -0000	1.15
  +++ aboutlfs.xml	22 Sep 2002 03:01:40 -0000	1.16
  @@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
   explained in full detail in Chapter 4. For example, let's assume that 
   the LFS partition is mounted on /mnt/lfs.</para>
   
  -<para>For example when you are told to run a command like
  +<para>When you are told to run a command like
   <userinput>./configure --prefix=$LFS/static</userinput> you actually have to
   execute <userinput>./configure --prefix=/mnt/lfs/static</userinput>.</para>
   
  @@ -22,8 +22,11 @@
   
   <para><screen><userinput>export LFS=/mnt/lfs</userinput></screen></para>
   
  -<para>Now, if you are told to run a command like <userinput>./configure
  ---prefix=$LFS/static</userinput> you can type that literally. Your shell will
  +<para>Now, if you are told to run a command like </para>
  +
  +<para><screen><userinput>./configure --prefix=$LFS/static</userinput></screen></para>
  +
  +<para>you can type that literally. Your shell will
   replace $LFS with /mnt/lfs when it processes the command line (meaning
   when you hit enter after having typed the command).</para>
   
  
  
  
  1.5       +3 -4      LFS/BOOK/chapter02/aboutsbus.xml
  
  Index: aboutsbus.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter02/aboutsbus.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- aboutsbus.xml	20 Sep 2002 21:11:27 -0000	1.4
  +++ aboutsbus.xml	22 Sep 2002 03:01:40 -0000	1.5
  @@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
   of identifying how long a package takes to compile. Why don't we use normal
   times like anybody else?</para>
   
  -<para>The biggest problem is that times cannot be acurate, not even a
  +<para>The biggest problem is that times cannot be accurate, not even a
   little bit. So many people install LFS on so many different systems, the
   times it takes to compile something varies too much. One package may take
   20 minutes on one system, but that same package may take 3 days on another
  @@ -22,9 +22,8 @@
   number of seconds it takes for Bash to install (the SBU value) and you get
   a close approximation of how long GCC will take on your system.</para>
   
  -<para>Note: SBUs don't work on SMP machines. We've seen that SBUs don't
  -work well on SMP based machines. So all bets are off if you're lucky enough
  -to have an SMP setup.</para>
  +<para>Note: We've seen that SBUs don't work well on SMP based machines. So
  +all bets are off if you're lucky enough to have an SMP setup.</para>
   
   </sect1>
   
  
  
  
  1.13      +11 -11    LFS/BOOK/chapter02/askforhelp.xml
  
  Index: askforhelp.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter02/askforhelp.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.12
  retrieving revision 1.13
  diff -u -r1.12 -r1.13
  --- askforhelp.xml	7 Jun 2002 17:51:28 -0000	1.12
  +++ askforhelp.xml	22 Sep 2002 03:01:40 -0000	1.13
  @@ -4,9 +4,9 @@
   
   <para>If you encounter a problem while using this book, and your problem 
   is not listed in the FAQ, you will find that most of the people on Internet 
  -Relay Chat (IRC) and on the mailing lists are willing to help you. (An 
  +Relay Chat (IRC) and on the mailing lists are willing to help you. An 
   overview of the LFS mailing lists can be found in 
  -<xref linkend="ch01-maillists"/>.) To assist us in diagnosing and solving
  +<xref linkend="ch01-maillists"/>. To assist us in diagnosing and solving
   your problem, include as much relevant information as possible in your
   request for help.</para>
   
  @@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
   
   <itemizedlist>
   <listitem><para>the version of the book you are using (being &version;),</para></listitem>
  -<listitem><para>the package or section you are having problems with,</para></listitem>
  +<listitem><para>the package or section giving you problems,</para></listitem>
   <listitem><para>the exact error message or symptom you are receiving,</para></listitem>
   <listitem><para>whether you have deviated from the book at all.</para></listitem>
   </itemizedlist>
  @@ -34,8 +34,8 @@
   
   <para>When something goes wrong during the stage where the configure
   script is run, look at the last lines of the
  -<filename>config.log</filename>. This file contains possible errors
  -encountered during configure which aren't always printed to the screen.
  +<filename>config.log</filename>. This file may contain errors
  +encountered during configure which weren't printed to the screen.
   Include those relevant lines if you decide to ask for help.</para>
   
   </sect2>
  @@ -45,9 +45,9 @@
   
   <para>To help us find the cause of the problem, both screen output and
   the contents of various files are useful. The screen output from both
  -the ./configure script and when make is run can be useful.  Don't
  -blindly include the whole thing but on the other hand, don't include too
  -little.  As an example, here is some screen output from make:</para>
  +the ./configure script and the make run can be useful.  Don't blindly
  +include the whole thing but on the other hand, don't include too little.
  +As an example, here is some screen output from make:</para>
   
   <para><screen>gcc -DALIASPATH=\"/mnt/lfs/usr/share/locale:.\" 
   -DLOCALEDIR=\"/mnt/lfs/usr/share/locale\" -DLIBDIR=\"/mnt/lfs/usr/lib\" 
  @@ -69,15 +69,15 @@
   says <screen>make [2]: *** [make] Error 1</screen> and onwards.  This
   isn't enough for us to diagnose the problem because it only tells us
   that <emphasis>something</emphasis> went wrong, not
  -<emphasis>what</emphasis> went wrong.  The whole section as
  -quoted above is what should be included to be helpful, because it
  +<emphasis>what</emphasis> went wrong.  The whole section, as
  +in the example above, is what should be included to be helpful, because it
   includes the command that was executed and the command's error
   message(s).</para>
   
   <para>An excellent article on asking for help on the Internet in general
   has been written by Eric S. Raymond.  It is available online at <ulink
   url="http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html"/>.
  -Read and follow the hints in this document and you are much more likely
  +Read and follow the hints in that document and you are much more likely
   to get a response to start with and also to get the help you actually
   need.</para>
   
  
  
  
  1.14      +8 -7      LFS/BOOK/chapter02/download.xml
  
  Index: download.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter02/download.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.13
  retrieving revision 1.14
  diff -u -r1.13 -r1.14
  --- download.xml	29 May 2002 23:15:53 -0000	1.13
  +++ download.xml	22 Sep 2002 03:01:40 -0000	1.14
  @@ -6,13 +6,14 @@
   packages that were downloaded are placed somewhere in $LFS/usr/src.</para>
   
   <para>While it doesn't matter at all where you save the downloaded
  -packages, we recommend storing it at least on the LFS partition. This just
  -makes sense because you would still have access to those files when you boot
  -into the LFS system. $LFS/usr/src is just a logical place to store source
  -code, but by no means a requirement. You may even want to create a
  -subdirectory under $LFS/usr/src for tarball storage. That way you can
  -separate tarballs from temporary build directories, but again that's up
  -to you.</para>
  +packages, we recommend storing it at least on the LFS partition. This
  +just makes sense because you need to have access to those those files
  +when you chroot to $LFS and when you boot into the LFS system, although
  +access when booted to $LFS could be handled other ways. $LFS/usr/src is
  +just a logical place to store source code, but by no means a requirement.
  +You may even want to create a subdirectory under $LFS/usr/src for tarball
  +storage. That way you can separate tarballs from temporary build
  +directories, but again that's up to you.</para>
   
   <para>The next chapter contains a list of all the packages that need to be
   downloaded. The LFS partition isn't created yet, so you can't store it
  
  
  
  1.28      +8 -8      LFS/BOOK/chapter02/install.xml
  
  Index: install.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter02/install.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.27
  retrieving revision 1.28
  diff -u -r1.27 -r1.28
  --- install.xml	20 Sep 2002 21:11:27 -0000	1.27
  +++ install.xml	22 Sep 2002 03:01:40 -0000	1.28
  @@ -38,7 +38,7 @@
   
   <para>If a file is just tar'ed, it is unpacked by running:</para>
   
  -<para><screen><userinput>tar xvf filename.tar</userinput></screen></para>
  +<para><screen><userinput>tar -xvf filename.tar</userinput></screen></para>
   
   <para>When an archive is unpacked, a new directory will be created under the
   current directory (and this book assumes that the archives are unpacked
  @@ -49,7 +49,7 @@
   
   <para>From time to time you will be dealing with single files such as patch
   files. These files are generally gzip'ed or bzip2'ed. Before such files
  -can be used they need to be uncompressed first.</para>
  +can be used they need to be uncompressed.</para>
   
   <para>If a file is gzip'ed, it is unpacked by running:</para>
   
  @@ -63,10 +63,10 @@
   it: either the directory that contains the sources can be deleted, or it
   can be kept. We highly recommend deleting it. If you don't do this and
   try to re-use the same source later on in the book (for example re-using
  -the source trees from Chapter 5 for use in Chapter 6), it may not work
  +the source trees from Chapter 5 in Chapter 6), it may not work
   as you expect it to. Source trees from Chapter 5 will have your host
   distribution's settings, which don't always apply to the LFS system
  -after you enter the chroot'ed environment. Even running something like
  +after you enter the chroot environment. Even running something like
   <emphasis>make clean</emphasis> doesn't always guarantee a clean source
   tree.</para>
   
  @@ -75,10 +75,10 @@
   available for when you need it again.</para>
   
   <para>There is one exception; the kernel source tree. Keep it around as you
  -will need it later in this book when building a kernel. Nothing will use
  -the kernel tree so the source tree won't be in your way.  If, however,
  -you are short of disk space, you can remove the kernel tree and re-untar
  -it later when required.</para>
  +will need it later in this book when building a kernel. Nothing before then
  +will use the kernel tree, so the source tree won't be in your way.  If,
  +however, you are short of disk space, you can remove the kernel tree and
  +re-untar it later when required.</para>
   
   </sect1>
   
  
  
  
  1.2       +2 -2      LFS/BOOK/chapter02/platform.xml
  
  Index: platform.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter02/platform.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.1
  retrieving revision 1.2
  diff -u -r1.1 -r1.2
  --- platform.xml	3 Dec 2001 20:54:10 -0000	1.1
  +++ platform.xml	22 Sep 2002 03:01:40 -0000	1.2
  @@ -2,8 +2,8 @@
   <title>Which Platform?</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="platform.html" dir="chapter02"?>
   
  -<para>LFS intends to be as far as possible platform independent.  Having
  -said that, the main LFS development work occurs on the x86 platform.  We
  +<para>LFS intends to be, as far as possible, platform independent. Having
  +said that, the main LFS development work occurs on the x86 platform. We
   attempt to include information where possible on differences for other
   platforms such as PPC.  If you come across a problem compiling which is
   not related to the x86 platform, still feel free to ask for help on the
  
  
  
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