cvs commit: LFS/BOOK/chapter07 bootscripts.xml console.xml hostname.xml hosts.xml inputrc.xml network.xml profile.xml setclock.xml sysklogd.xml usage.xml

manuel at linuxfromscratch.org manuel at linuxfromscratch.org
Sat Jun 19 09:54:59 PDT 2004


manuel      04/06/19 10:54:59

  Modified:    BOOK/chapter07 bootscripts.xml console.xml hostname.xml
                        hosts.xml inputrc.xml network.xml profile.xml
                        setclock.xml sysklogd.xml usage.xml
  Log:
  Tags corrections
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.13      +3 -3      LFS/BOOK/chapter07/bootscripts.xml
  
  Index: bootscripts.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/bootscripts.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.12
  retrieving revision 1.13
  diff -u -r1.12 -r1.13
  --- bootscripts.xml	24 May 2004 21:37:26 -0000	1.12
  +++ bootscripts.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.13
  @@ -63,8 +63,8 @@
   <listitem>
   <indexterm zone="ch-scripts-bootscripts cleanfs-bootscripts"><primary sortas="d-cleanfs">cleanfs</primary></indexterm>
   <para>removes files that shouldn't be
  -preserved between reboots, such as those in <filename>/var/run/</filename> and
  -<filename>/var/lock/</filename>. It re-creates <filename>/var/run/utmp</filename>
  +preserved between reboots, such as those in <filename class="directory">/var/run/</filename> and
  +<filename class="directory">/var/lock/</filename>. It re-creates <filename>/var/run/utmp</filename>
   and removes the possibly present <filename>/etc/nologin</filename>,
   <filename>/fastboot</filename> and <filename>/forcefsck</filename> files.</para>
   </listitem>
  @@ -125,7 +125,7 @@
   <term><command>mountkernfs</command></term>
   <listitem>
   <indexterm zone="ch-scripts-bootscripts mountkernfs-bootscripts"><primary sortas="d-mountkernfs">mountkernfs</primary></indexterm>
  -<para>is used to mount kernel-provided file systems, such as /proc.</para>
  +<para>is used to mount kernel-provided file systems, such as <systemitem class="filesystem">proc</systemitem>.</para>
   </listitem>
   </varlistentry>
   
  
  
  
  1.6       +13 -12    LFS/BOOK/chapter07/console.xml
  
  Index: console.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/console.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.5
  retrieving revision 1.6
  diff -u -r1.5 -r1.6
  --- console.xml	12 Jun 2004 14:35:28 -0000	1.5
  +++ console.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.6
  @@ -38,23 +38,24 @@
   Once you decided, create the
   configuration file with the following command:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat >/etc/sysconfig/console <<"EOF"</userinput>
  -KEYMAP="<emphasis>arguments for loadkeys</emphasis>"
  -FONT="<emphasis>arguments for setfont</emphasis>"
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +<screen><userinput>cat >/etc/sysconfig/console <<"EOF"
  +KEYMAP="<replaceable>[arguments for loadkeys]</replaceable>"
  +FONT="<replaceable>[arguments for setfont]</replaceable>"
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   <para>E.g., for Spanish users who also want to use the Euro character
   (accessible by pressing Alt+E),
   the following settings are correct:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat >/etc/sysconfig/console <<"EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat >/etc/sysconfig/console <<"EOF"
   KEYMAP="es euro"
   FONT="lat9-16 -u iso01"
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   <note><para>The FONT line above is correct only for the ISO-8859-15
   character set. If you prefer ISO-8859-1 and therefore use a pound sign
   instead of Euro, the correct FONT line is:</para>
  +
   <screen><userinput>FONT="lat1-16"</userinput></screen></note>
   
   <para>If the KEYMAP or FONT variable is not set, the
  @@ -63,17 +64,17 @@
   
   <para>In some keymaps, the Backspace and Delete keys send characters
   different form ones in the default keymap built into the kernel.
  -This confuses some applications, e.g. <application>Emacs</application>
  +This confuses some applications, e.g., <application>Emacs</application>
   displays its help (instead of erasing the character before the cursor)
   when you press Backspace. To check if your keymap is affected (this works
   only for i386 keymaps):</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>zgrep '\W14\W' /path/to/your/keymap</userinput></screen>
  +<screen><userinput>zgrep '\W14\W' <replaceable>[/path/to/your/keymap]</replaceable></userinput></screen>
   
   <para>If you see that keycode 14 is Backspace and not Delete,
   create the following keymap snippet to fix this issue:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>mkdir -p /etc/kbd & & cat >/etc/kbd/bs-sends-del <<"EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>mkdir -p /etc/kbd & & cat >/etc/kbd/bs-sends-del <<"EOF"
                   keycode 14 =    Delete  Delete          Delete  Delete
           alt     keycode 14 =    Meta_Delete
   altgr   alt     keycode 14 =    Meta_Delete
  @@ -81,14 +82,14 @@
   altgr   control keycode 111 =   Boot
   control alt     keycode 111 =   Boot
   altgr   control alt keycode 111 = Boot
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   <para>Then tell the <command>console</command> script to load this snippet
   after the main keymap:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat >>/etc/sysconfig/console <<"EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat >>/etc/sysconfig/console <<"EOF"
   KEYMAP_CORRECTION="/etc/kbd/bs-sends-del"
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   <para>If you decided to
   compile your keymap directly into the kernel later on in <xref
  
  
  
  1.6       +4 -4      LFS/BOOK/chapter07/hostname.xml
  
  Index: hostname.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/hostname.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.5
  retrieving revision 1.6
  diff -u -r1.5 -r1.6
  --- hostname.xml	3 May 2004 10:59:43 -0000	1.5
  +++ hostname.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.6
  @@ -12,14 +12,14 @@
   <secondary>configuring</secondary></indexterm>
   
   <para>Part of the localnet script is setting up the system's hostname. This
  -needs to be configured in the /etc/sysconfig/network.</para>
  +needs to be configured in the <filename>/etc/sysconfig/network</filename>.</para>
   
  -<para>Create the /etc/sysconfig/network file and enter a hostname by
  +<para>Create the <filename>/etc/sysconfig/network</filename> file and enter a hostname by
   running:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>echo "HOSTNAME=lfs" > /etc/sysconfig/network</userinput></screen>
  +<screen><userinput>echo "HOSTNAME=<replaceable>[lfs]</replaceable>" > /etc/sysconfig/network</userinput></screen>
   
  -<para><quote>lfs</quote> needs to be replaced with the name the computer is 
  +<para><replaceable>[lfs]</replaceable> needs to be replaced with the name the computer is 
   to be called. You should not enter the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain
   Name) here. That information will be put in the
   <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file later on.</para>
  
  
  
  1.20      +13 -10    LFS/BOOK/chapter07/hosts.xml
  
  Index: hosts.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/hosts.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.19
  retrieving revision 1.20
  diff -u -r1.19 -r1.20
  --- hosts.xml	3 May 2004 10:59:43 -0000	1.19
  +++ hosts.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.20
  @@ -18,12 +18,14 @@
   <secondary>/etc/hosts</secondary></indexterm>
   
   <para>If a network card is to be configured, you have to decide on the
  -IP-address, FQDN and possible aliases for use in the /etc/hosts file. The
  +IP-address, FQDN and possible aliases for use in the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file. The
   syntax is:</para>
   
   <screen><IP address> myhost.example.org aliases</screen>
   
  -<para>Unless your computer is to be visible to the Internet (e.g. you have a registered domain and a valid block of assigned IP addresses - most of us don't have this)you should make sure that the IP-address is in the private network
  +<para>Unless your computer is to be visible to the Internet (e.g., you have a 
  +registered domain and a valid block of assigned IP addresses - most of us don't 
  +have this) you should make sure that the IP-address is in the private network
   IP-address range. Valid ranges are:</para>
   
   <screen>	Class Networks
  @@ -32,7 +34,8 @@
   	C     192.168.0.0 through 192.168.255.0</screen>
   
   <para>A valid IP address could be 192.168.1.1. A valid FQDN for this IP could
  -be www.linuxfromscratch.org (not recommended as this is a valid registered domain address and could cause your domain name server problems).</para>
  +be www.linuxfromscratch.org (not recommended as this is a valid registered domain 
  +address and could cause your domain name server problems).</para>
   
   <para>If you aren't going to use a network card, you still need to 
   come up with a FQDN. This is necessary for certain programs to operate
  @@ -41,27 +44,27 @@
   <para>If a network card is not going to be configured, create the
   <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file by running:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/hosts << "EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/hosts << "EOF"
   # Begin /etc/hosts (no network card version)
   
  -127.0.0.1 <value of HOSTNAME>.example.org <value of HOSTNAME> localhost
  +127.0.0.1 <replaceable>[<value of HOSTNAME>.example.org]</replaceable> <replaceable>[value of HOSTNAME]</replaceable> localhost
   
   # End /etc/hosts (no network card version)
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   <para>If a network card is to be configured, create the 
   <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file by running:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/hosts << "EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/hosts << "EOF"
   # Begin /etc/hosts (network card version)
   
   127.0.0.1 localhost
  -192.168.1.1 <value of HOSTNAME>.example.org <value of HOSTNAME>
  +<replaceable>[192.168.1.1]</replaceable> <replaceable>[<value of HOSTNAME>.example.org]</replaceable> <replaceable>[value of HOSTNAME]</replaceable>
   
   # End /etc/hosts (network card version)
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
  -<para>Of course, the 192.168.1.1 and <value of HOSTNAME>.example.org
  +<para>Of course, the <replaceable>[192.168.1.1]</replaceable> and <replaceable>[<value of HOSTNAME>.example.org]</replaceable>
   have to be changed to your liking (or requirements if assigned an IP-address
   by a network/system administrator and this machine is planned to be connected
   to an existing network).</para>
  
  
  
  1.3       +8 -6      LFS/BOOK/chapter07/inputrc.xml
  
  Index: inputrc.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/inputrc.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- inputrc.xml	6 May 2004 16:22:04 -0000	1.2
  +++ inputrc.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.3
  @@ -7,7 +7,9 @@
   <title>Creating the /etc/inputrc file</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="inputrc.html"?>
   
  -<para><filename>Inputrc</filename> deals with the mapping of the keyboard for 
  +<indexterm zone="ch-scripts-inputrc"><primary sortas="e-/etc/inputrc">/etc/inputrc</primary></indexterm>
  +
  +<para><filename>/etc/inputrc</filename> deals with the mapping of the keyboard for
   certain situations.  This file is the start-up file used by
   <application>readline</application> - the input related library used by 
   <application>Bash</application> and most other shells.</para>
  @@ -26,7 +28,7 @@
   <filename>/etc/profile</filename> is read (usually at login).  If you
   want your system to use both, or don't want <emphasis>global</emphasis>
   keyboard handling, it is a good idea to place a default
  -<filename>.inputrc</filename> into the <filename>/etc/skel</filename>
  +<filename>.inputrc</filename> into the <filename class="directory">/etc/skel</filename>
   directory for use with new users.</para>
   
   <para>
  @@ -36,17 +38,17 @@
   </para>
   
   <para>If you will create an <filename>.inputrc</filename> in
  -<filename>/etc/skel</filename> using the command below, change the
  +<filename class="directory">/etc/skel</filename> using the command below, change the
   command's output to <filename>/etc/skel/.inputrc</filename> and be
   sure to check/set permissions afterward. Then you can just copy that
   file to <filename>/etc/inputrc</filename> and the home directory
   of any user already existing in the system, including root, that needs
  -a private version of the file.  Be sure to use the <option>-p</option> parameter
  +a private version of the file.  Be sure to use the <parameter>-p</parameter> parameter
   of <command>cp</command> to maintain permissions and be sure to change owner and group
   appropriately.
   </para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/inputrc << "EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/inputrc << "EOF"
   # Begin /etc/inputrc
   
   # Make sure we don't output everything on the 1 line
  @@ -89,6 +91,6 @@
   "\e[F": end-of-line
   
   # End /etc/inputrc
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   </sect1>
  
  
  
  1.26      +18 -17    LFS/BOOK/chapter07/network.xml
  
  Index: network.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/network.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.25
  retrieving revision 1.26
  diff -u -r1.25 -r1.26
  --- network.xml	6 May 2004 23:14:53 -0000	1.25
  +++ network.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.26
  @@ -16,7 +16,7 @@
   
   <para>If you don't have any network cards, you are most likely not going to
   create any configuration files relating to network cards. If that is the
  -case, you must remove the <filename>network</filename> symlinks from all the
  +case, you must remove the <filename class="symlink">network</filename> symlinks from all the
   run-level directories
   (<filename class="directory">/etc/rc.d/rc*.d</filename>)</para>
   
  @@ -24,36 +24,36 @@
   <title>Creating network interface configuration files</title>
   
   <para>Which interfaces are brought up and down by the network script depends on
  -the files in the /etc/sysconfig/network-devices directory. This
  -directory should contain files in the form of ifconfig.xyz, where xyz is a
  +the files in the <filename class="directory">/etc/sysconfig/network-devices</filename> directory. This
  +directory should contain files in the form of <filename>ifconfig.xyz</filename>, where <quote>xyz</quote> is a
   network interface name (such as eth0 or eth0:1)</para>
   
  -<para>If you decide to rename or move this /etc/sysconfig/network-devices
  -directory, make sure you update the /etc/sysconfig/rc file as well and
  -update the network_devices by providing it with the new path.</para>
  +<para>If you decide to rename or move this <filename class="directory">/etc/sysconfig/network-devices</filename>
  +directory, make sure you update the <filename>/etc/sysconfig/rc</filename> file as well and
  +update the <quote>network_devices</quote> by providing it with the new path.</para>
   
   <para>Now, new files are created in that directory.
  -The following command creates a sample ifconfig.eth0 file:</para>
  +The following command creates a sample <filename>ifconfig.eth0</filename> file:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/sysconfig/network-devices/ifconfig.eth0 << "EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/sysconfig/network-devices/ifconfig.eth0 << "EOF"
   ONBOOT=yes
   SERVICE=static
   IP=192.168.1.1
   GATEWAY=192.168.1.2
   NETMASK=255.255.255.0
   BROADCAST=192.168.1.255
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   <para>Of course, the values of those variables have to be changed 
   in every file to match the proper setup. If the ONBOOT variable is set
  -to yes, the network script will bring up the equivalent NIC (Network Interface Card)
  +to <quote>yes</quote>, the network script will bring up the equivalent NIC (Network Interface Card)
    during the booting of the system.
  -If set to anything but yes, the equivalent NIC will be ignored by the network script
  +If set to anything but <quote>yes</quote>, the equivalent NIC will be ignored by the network script
   and not brought up.</para>
   
   <para>The SERVICE entry defines the method of obtaining the IP address.
   The LFS bootscripts have a modular IP assignment format, and by creating
  -additional files in /etc/sysconfig/network-devices/services, you can allow
  +additional files in <filename class="directory">/etc/sysconfig/network-devices/services</filename>, you can allow
   other IP assignment methods.  This would commonly be used if you need DHCP,
   which is addressed in the BLFS book.</para>
   
  @@ -62,8 +62,9 @@
   
   </sect2>
   
  -<sect2>
  +<sect2 id="resolv.conf">
   <title>Creating the /etc/resolv.conf file</title>
  +<indexterm zone="resolv.conf"><primary sortas="e-/etc/resolv.conf">/etc/resolv.conf</primary></indexterm>
   
   <para>If you're going to be connected to the Internet then most likely you'll
   need some means of DNS name resolution to resolve Internet domain names to IP
  @@ -71,15 +72,15 @@
   into <filename>/etc/resolv.conf</filename>. Create the file by running the
   following:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/resolv.conf << "EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/resolv.conf << "EOF"
   # Begin /etc/resolv.conf
   
  -nameserver <IP address of your nameserver>
  +nameserver <replaceable>[IP address of your nameserver]</replaceable>
   
   # End /etc/resolv.conf
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
  -<para>Of course, replace <IP address of your nameserver> with the IP
  +<para>Of course, replace <replaceable>[IP address of your nameserver]</replaceable> with the IP
   address of the DNS most appropriate for your setup. There will often be
   more than one entry (requirements demand secondary servers for fallback capability). The IP address may even be a router on your local network.</para>
   
  
  
  
  1.3       +16 -13    LFS/BOOK/chapter07/profile.xml
  
  Index: profile.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/profile.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.2
  retrieving revision 1.3
  diff -u -r1.2 -r1.3
  --- profile.xml	6 May 2004 16:22:04 -0000	1.2
  +++ profile.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.3
  @@ -7,8 +7,10 @@
   <title>The Bash Shell Startup Files</title>
   <?dbhtml filename="profile.html"?>
   
  -<para>The shell program <filename>/bin/bash</filename> (hereafter
  -referred to as just "the shell") uses a collection of startup files to
  +<indexterm zone="ch-scripts-profile"><primary sortas="e-/etc/profile">/etc/profile</primary></indexterm>
  +
  +<para>The shell program <command>/bin/bash</command> (hereafter
  +referred to as just <quote>the shell</quote>) uses a collection of startup files to
   help create an environment to run in.  Each file has a specific use and
   may affect login and interactive environments differently.  The files in
   the <filename class="directory">/etc</filename> directory generally provide global
  @@ -17,9 +19,9 @@
   </para>
   
   <para>An interactive login shell is started after a successful login, using
  -<filename>/bin/login</filename>, by reading the
  +<command>/bin/login</command>, by reading the
   <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> file.  An
  -interactive non-login shell is started at the command-line (e.g.
  +interactive non-login shell is started at the command-line (e.g.,
   <prompt>[prompt]$</prompt><command>/bin/bash</command>).  A non-interactive 
   shell is usually present when a shell script is running.  It is non-interactive
   because it is processing a script and not waiting for user input between
  @@ -35,31 +37,32 @@
   
   <para>A base <filename>/etc/profile</filename> created below only sets some
   environment variables necessary for Bash to accept keystrokes properly,
  -even in non-English locale. Replace "ll" with the
  -two-letter code for your language (e.g. "en") and
  -"CC" with the two-letter code for your country
  -(e.g. "GB"). Also you may need to specify
  +even in non-English locale. Replace <replaceable>[ll]</replaceable> with the
  +two-letter code for your language (e.g., <quote>en</quote>) and
  +<replaceable>[CC]</replaceable> with the two-letter code for your country
  +(e.g., <quote>GB</quote>). Also you may need to specify
   (and this is actually the preferred form) your
  -character encoding (e.g. "iso8859-1") after a dot (so that the result
  -is "en_GB.iso8859-1").
  +character encoding (e.g. <quote>iso8859-1</quote>) after a dot (so that the result
  +is <quote>en_GB.iso8859-1</quote>).
   Issue the following command for more information:</para>
   
   <screen><userinput>man 3 setlocale</userinput></screen>
   
  -<para>The list of all locales supported by glibc can be obtained by running
  +<para>The list of all locales supported by Glibc can be obtained by running
   the following command:</para>
   
   <screen><userinput>locale -a</userinput></screen>
   
   <para>Now, when you are sure about your locale settings, create the
   <filename>/etc/profile</filename> file:</para>
  +
   <screen><userinput>cat > /etc/profile << "EOF"
   # Begin /etc/profile
   # Written for Linux From Scratch
   # by Alexander E. Patrakov
   
  -export LC_ALL=ll_CC
  -export LANG=ll_CC
  +export LC_ALL=<replaceable>[ll]</replaceable>_<replaceable>[CC]</replaceable>
  +export LANG=<replaceable>[ll]</replaceable>_<replaceable>[CC]</replaceable>
   export INPUTRC=/etc/inputrc
   
   # End /etc/profile
  
  
  
  1.23      +4 -4      LFS/BOOK/chapter07/setclock.xml
  
  Index: setclock.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/setclock.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.22
  retrieving revision 1.23
  diff -u -r1.22 -r1.23
  --- setclock.xml	3 May 2004 10:59:43 -0000	1.22
  +++ setclock.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.23
  @@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
   <primary sortas="d-setclock">setclock</primary>
   <secondary>configuring</secondary></indexterm>
   
  -<para>This setclock script reads the time from your hardware clock, also
  +<para>This <command>setclock</command> script reads the time from your hardware clock, also
   known as BIOS or CMOS (Complementry Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) clock, and either converts that time to localtime
   using the <filename>/etc/localtime</filename> file (if the hardware clock
   is set to GMT) or not (if the hardware clock is already set to localtime).
  @@ -19,19 +19,19 @@
   not, so we need to configure that here ourselves.</para>
   
   <para>Change the value of the <emphasis>UTC</emphasis> variable below to a
  -<emphasis>0</emphasis> (zero) if your hardware clock is not set to GMT
  +<parameter>0</parameter> (zero) if your hardware clock is not set to GMT
   time.</para>
   
   <para>Create a new file <filename>/etc/sysconfig/clock</filename> by running
   the following:</para>
   
  -<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/sysconfig/clock << "EOF"</userinput>
  +<screen><userinput>cat > /etc/sysconfig/clock << "EOF"
   # Begin /etc/sysconfig/clock
   
   UTC=1
   
   # End /etc/sysconfig/clock
  -<userinput>EOF</userinput></screen>
  +EOF</userinput></screen>
   
   <para>Now, you may want to take a look at a very good hint explaining how we
   deal with time on LFS at <ulink url="&hints-root;time.txt"/>. 
  
  
  
  1.15      +1 -1      LFS/BOOK/chapter07/sysklogd.xml
  
  Index: sysklogd.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/sysklogd.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.14
  retrieving revision 1.15
  diff -u -r1.14 -r1.15
  --- sysklogd.xml	3 May 2004 10:59:43 -0000	1.14
  +++ sysklogd.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.15
  @@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
   <secondary>configuring</secondary></indexterm>
   
   <para>The <filename>sysklogd</filename> script invokes the
  -<command>syslogd</command> program with the <emphasis>-m 0</emphasis> option.
  +<command>syslogd</command> program with the <parameter>-m 0</parameter> option.
   This option turns off the periodic timestamp mark that
   <command>syslogd</command> writes to the log files every 20 minutes by default.
   If you want to turn on this periodic timestamp mark, edit the
  
  
  
  1.23      +42 -30    LFS/BOOK/chapter07/usage.xml
  
  Index: usage.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvsroot/LFS/BOOK/chapter07/usage.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.22
  retrieving revision 1.23
  diff -u -r1.22 -r1.23
  --- usage.xml	3 May 2004 10:59:43 -0000	1.22
  +++ usage.xml	19 Jun 2004 16:54:58 -0000	1.23
  @@ -21,7 +21,7 @@
   <para>SysVinit (which we'll call <emphasis>init</emphasis> from now on) works 
   using a run-levels scheme. There are 7 (from 0 to 6) run-levels
   (actually, there are more run-levels but they are for special cases and 
  -generally not used. The init man page describes those details), and each 
  +generally not used. The <command>init</command> man page describes those details), and each
   one of those corresponds to the things the computer is supposed to do when 
   it starts up. The default run-level is 3. Here are the descriptions of the 
   different run-levels as they are often implemented:</para>
  @@ -36,13 +36,14 @@
   
   <para>The command used to change run-levels is <command>init
   <runlevel></command> where <runlevel> is the target run-level. For
  -example, to reboot the computer, a user would issue the <command>init
  -6</command> command. The <command>reboot</command> command is just an alias for
  +example, to reboot the computer, a user would issue the <userinput>init
  +6</userinput> command. The <command>reboot</command> command is just an alias for
   it, as is the <command>halt</command> command an alias for <command>init
   0</command>.</para>
   
  -<para>There are a number of directories under <filename>/etc/rc.d</filename>
  -that look like like rc?.d (where ? is the number of the run-level) and rcsysinit.d
  +<para>There are a number of directories under <filename class="directory">/etc/rc.d</filename>
  +that look like like <filename class="directory">rc?.d</filename> (where ? is the 
  +number of the run-level) and <filename class="directory">rcsysinit.d</filename>
   all containing a number of symbolic links. Some begin with a K, the others begin
   with an S, and all of them have two numbers following the initial letter. The K
   means to stop (kill) a service, and the S means to start a service. The numbers
  @@ -50,17 +51,20 @@
   number the sooner it gets executed. When init switches to another run-level, the
   appropriate services get killed and others get started.</para>
   
  -<para>The real scripts are in /etc/rc.d/init.d. They do all the work, and the
  -symlinks all point to them. Killing links and starting links point to 
  -the same script in /etc/rc.d/init.d. That's because the scripts can be 
  -called with different parameters like start, stop, restart, reload, 
  -status. When a K link is encountered, the appropriate script is run with 
  -the stop argument. When an S link is encountered, the appropriate script 
  -is run with the start argument.</para>
  +<para>The real scripts are in <filename class="directory">/etc/rc.d/init.d</filename>.
  +They do all the work, and the symlinks all point to them. Killing links and starting links 
  +point to the same script in <filename class="directory">/etc/rc.d/init.d</filename>.
  +That's because the scripts can be called with different parameters like 
  +<parameter>start</parameter>, <parameter>stop</parameter>, 
  +<parameter>restart</parameter>, <parameter>reload</parameter>,
  +<parameter>status</parameter>. When a K link is encountered, the appropriate 
  +script is run with the <parameter>stop</parameter> argument. When an S link is 
  +encountered, the appropriate script is run with the <parameter>start</parameter> 
  +argument.</para>
   
   <para>There is one exception. Links that start with an S in the
   rc0.d and rc6.d directories will not cause anything to be started. They
  -will be called with the parameter <emphasis>stop</emphasis> to stop
  +will be called with the parameter <parameter>stop</parameter> to stop
   something. The logic behind it is that when you are going to reboot or
   halt the system, you don't want to start anything, only stop the
   system.</para>
  @@ -68,26 +72,34 @@
   <para>These are descriptions of what the arguments make the 
   scripts do:</para>
   
  -<itemizedlist>
  -
  -<listitem><para><emphasis>start</emphasis>: The service is 
  -started.</para></listitem>
  -
  -<listitem><para><emphasis>stop</emphasis>: The service is 
  -stopped.</para></listitem>
  -
  -<listitem><para><emphasis>restart</emphasis>: The service is 
  -stopped and then started again.</para></listitem>
  -
  -<listitem><para><emphasis>reload</emphasis>: The configuration 
  -of the service is updated. 
  +<variablelist>
  +<varlistentry>
  +<term><parameter>start</parameter></term>
  +<listitem><para>The service is started.</para></listitem>
  +</varlistentry>
  +
  +<varlistentry>
  +<term><parameter>stop</parameter></term>
  +<listitem><para>The service is stopped.</para></listitem>
  +</varlistentry>
  +
  +<varlistentry>
  +<term><parameter>restart</parameter></term>
  +<listitem><para>The service is stopped and then started again.</para></listitem>
  +</varlistentry>
  +
  +<varlistentry>
  +<term><parameter>reload</parameter></term>
  +<listitem><para>The configuration of the service is updated.
   This is used after the configuration file of a service was modified, when 
   the service doesn't need to be restarted.</para></listitem>
  +</varlistentry>
   
  -<listitem><para><emphasis>status</emphasis>: Tells if the service 
  -is running and with which PIDs.</para></listitem>
  -
  -</itemizedlist>
  +<varlistentry>
  +<term><parameter>status</parameter></term>
  +<listitem><para>Tells if the service is running and with which PIDs.</para></listitem>
  +</varlistentry>
  +</variablelist>
   
   <para>Feel free to modify the way the boot process works (after all, it's your 
   own LFS system). The files given here are just an example of how it can be 
  
  
  



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