r4129 - in branches/testing/BOOK: chapter02 chapter04

manuel at linuxfromscratch.org manuel at linuxfromscratch.org
Sun Sep 5 02:58:30 PDT 2004


Author: manuel
Date: 2004-09-05 03:58:29 -0600 (Sun, 05 Sep 2004)
New Revision: 4129

Modified:
   branches/testing/BOOK/chapter02/mounting.xml
   branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/aboutlfs.xml
   branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/settingenviron.xml
Log:
Started the proper use of <envar> tag.

Modified: branches/testing/BOOK/chapter02/mounting.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/testing/BOOK/chapter02/mounting.xml	2004-09-05 09:52:02 UTC (rev 4128)
+++ branches/testing/BOOK/chapter02/mounting.xml	2004-09-05 09:58:29 UTC (rev 4129)
@@ -14,8 +14,8 @@
 class="directory">/mnt/lfs</filename>, but the directory choice is up
 to you.</para>
 
-<para>Choose a mount point and assign it to the LFS environment
-variable by running:</para>
+<para>Choose a mount point and assign it to the <envar>LFS</envar> 
+environment variable by running:</para>
 
 <screen><userinput>export LFS=/mnt/lfs</userinput></screen>
 

Modified: branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/aboutlfs.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/aboutlfs.xml	2004-09-05 09:52:02 UTC (rev 4128)
+++ branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/aboutlfs.xml	2004-09-05 09:58:29 UTC (rev 4129)
@@ -7,10 +7,10 @@
 <title>About $LFS</title>
 <?dbhtml filename="aboutlfs.html"?>
 
-<para>Throughout this book, the environment variable LFS will be used
-several times. It is paramount that this variable is always defined.
+<para>Throughout this book, the environment variable <envar>LFS</envar> will
+be used several times. It is paramount that this variable is always defined.
 It should be set to the mount point chosen for the LFS partition.
-Check that the LFS variable is set up properly with:</para>
+Check that the <envar>LFS</envar> variable is set up properly with:</para>
 
 <screen><userinput>echo $LFS</userinput></screen>
 
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
 <quote>/mnt/lfs</quote> (or whatever the variable was set to) when it
 processes the command line.</para>
 
-<para>Do not forget to check that <quote>$LFS</quote> is set whenever
+<para>Do not forget to check that <envar>$LFS</envar> is set whenever
 you leave and reenter the current working environment (as when doing a
 <quote>su</quote> to <emphasis>root</emphasis> or another user).</para>
 

Modified: branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/settingenviron.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/settingenviron.xml	2004-09-05 09:52:02 UTC (rev 4128)
+++ branches/testing/BOOK/chapter04/settingenviron.xml	2004-09-05 09:58:29 UTC (rev 4129)
@@ -24,8 +24,8 @@
 -i.../bin/bash</command> command in the
 <filename>.bash_profile</filename> file replaces the running shell
 with a new one with a completely empty environment, except for the
-<emphasis>HOME</emphasis>, <emphasis>TERM</emphasis>, and
-<emphasis>PS1</emphasis> variables. This ensures that no unwanted and
+<envar>HOME</envar>, <envar>TERM</envar>, and
+<envar>PS1</envar> variables. This ensures that no unwanted and
 potentially hazardous environment variables from the host system leak
 into the build environment. The technique used here achieves the goal
 of ensuring a clean environment.</para>
@@ -48,10 +48,10 @@
 <para>The <command>set +h</command> command turns off
 <command>bash</command>'s hash function. Hashing is ordinarily a useful 
 feature—<command>bash</command> uses a hash table to remember the
-full pathnames of executable files to avoid searching the PATH time
+full pathnames of executable files to avoid searching the <envar>PATH</envar> time
 and again to find the same executable. However, the new tools
 should be used as soon as they are installed. By switching off the
-hash function, the shell will always search the PATH when a program is
+hash function, the shell will always search the <envar>PATH</envar> when a program is
 to be run. As such, the shell will find the newly compiled
 tools in <filename class="directory">$LFS/tools</filename> as soon as
 they are available without remembering a previous version of the same
@@ -63,21 +63,21 @@
 by the open(2) system call, new files will end up with permission mode
 644 and directories with mode 755).</para>
 
-<para>The <emphasis>LFS</emphasis> variable should be set to the
+<para>The <envar>LFS</envar> variable should be set to the
 chosen mount point.</para>
 
-<para>The <emphasis>LC_ALL</emphasis> variable controls the
+<para>The <envar>LC_ALL</envar> variable controls the
 localization of certain programs, making their messages follow the
 conventions of a specified country.  If the host system uses a version
-of Glibc older than 2.2.4, having LC_ALL set to something other than
+of Glibc older than 2.2.4, having <envar>LC_ALL</envar> set to something other than
 <quote>POSIX</quote> or <quote>C</quote> (during this chapter) may
 cause issues if you exit the chroot environment and wish to return
-later. Setting <emphasis>LC_ALL</emphasis> to <quote>POSIX</quote>
+later. Setting <envar>LC_ALL</envar> to <quote>POSIX</quote>
 or <quote>C</quote> (the two are equivalent) ensures that
 everything will work as expected in the chroot environment.</para>
 
 <para>By putting <filename class="directory">/tools/bin</filename>
-ahead of the standard PATH, all the programs installed in <xref
+ahead of the standard <envar>PATH</envar>, all the programs installed in <xref
 linkend="chapter-temporary-tools"/> are picked up by the shell
 immediately after their installation. This, combined with turning off 
 hashing, limits the risk that old programs from




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