r5320 - in branches/cross-lfs/BOOK: partitioning/common partitioning/raq2 prologue/common

jim at linuxfromscratch.org jim at linuxfromscratch.org
Thu May 12 15:14:30 PDT 2005


Author: jim
Date: 2005-05-12 16:14:29 -0600 (Thu, 12 May 2005)
New Revision: 5320

Modified:
   branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingfilesystem.xml
   branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingpartition.xml
   branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingfilesystem.xml
   branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingpartition.xml
   branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/prologue/common/audience.xml
Log:
Wording changes

Modified: branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingfilesystem.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingfilesystem.xml	2005-05-12 22:07:33 UTC (rev 5319)
+++ branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingfilesystem.xml	2005-05-12 22:14:29 UTC (rev 5320)
@@ -9,9 +9,9 @@
 
 <para>Now that a blank partition has been set up, the file system can
 be created. The most widely-used system in the Linux world is the
-second extended file system (ext2), but with the newer high-capacity
-hard disks, the journaling file systems are becoming increasingly
-popular.  Here we will create an ext2 file system, but build
+second extended file system (ext2), but with newer high-capacity
+hard disks, journaling file systems are becoming increasingly
+popular.  We will create an ext2 file system, however build
 instructions for other file systems can be found at <ulink
 url="&blfs-root;view/svn/postlfs/filesystems.html"/>.</para>
 
@@ -23,8 +23,7 @@
 partition (<filename class="devicefile">hda5</filename> in our previous example).</para>
 
 <para>If a swap partition was created, it will need to be initialized
-as a swap partition too (also known as formatting, as described above
-with <command>mke2fs</command>) by running the following. If you are using an existing
+as a swap partition by using the command below. If you are using an existing
 swap partition, there is no need to format it.</para>
 
 <screen><userinput>mkswap /dev/<replaceable>[yyy]</replaceable></userinput></screen>

Modified: branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingpartition.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingpartition.xml	2005-05-12 22:07:33 UTC (rev 5319)
+++ branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/common/creatingpartition.xml	2005-05-12 22:14:29 UTC (rev 5320)
@@ -7,36 +7,34 @@
 <title>Creating a New Partition</title>
 <?dbhtml filename="creatingpartition.html"?>
 
-<!--Edit Me-->
 <para>Like most other operating systems, LFS is usually installed on
-a dedicated partition.  If you have an empty partition or enough
-unpartitioned space on one of your hard disks to make one, using this
-for your LFS installation is recommended.  However, an LFS system (in
+a dedicated partition.  The recommended approach to building an LFS
+system is to use an available empty partition or, if you have enough
+unpartitioned space, to create one. However, an LFS system (in
 fact even multiple LFS systems) may also be installed on a partition
 already occupied by another operating system and the different systems
 will co-exist peacefully.  The document
-<ulink url="&hints-root;/lfs_next_to_existing_systems.txt"/> explains
+<ulink url="&hints-root;lfs_next_to_existing_systems.txt"/> explains
 how to implement this, whereas this book discusses the method of
 using a fresh partition for the installation.</para>
-<!--End Edit Me-->
 
 <para>A minimal system requires a partition of around 1.3 gigabytes
 (GB).  This is enough to store all the source tarballs and compile 
 the packages. However, if the LFS system is intended to be the primary
 Linux system, additional software will probably be installed which
 will require additional space (2 or 3 GB). The LFS system itself will
-not take up this much space. A large portion of this required amount
-of space is to provide sufficient free temporary space. Compiling
+not take up this much room. A large portion of this requirement
+is to provide sufficient free temporary storage. Compiling
 packages can require a lot of disk space which will be reclaimed after
 the package is installed.</para>
 
 <para>Because there is not always enough Random Access Memory (RAM)
 available for compilation processes, it is a good idea to use a small
-disk partition as swap space.  This space is used by the kernel to
-store seldom-used data to make room in memory for active processes.
+disk partition as swap space.  This is used by the kernel to
+store seldom-used data and leave more memory available for active processes.
 The swap partition for an LFS system can be the same as the one used
-by the host system, so another swap partition will not need to be
-created if your host system already has one setup.</para>
+by the host system, in which case it is not necessary to create another
+one.</para>
 
 <para>Start a disk partitioning program such as
 <command>cfdisk</command> or <command>fdisk</command> with a command

Modified: branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingfilesystem.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingfilesystem.xml	2005-05-12 22:07:33 UTC (rev 5319)
+++ branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingfilesystem.xml	2005-05-12 22:14:29 UTC (rev 5320)
@@ -9,9 +9,9 @@
 
 <para>Now that a blank partition has been set up, the file system can
 be created. The most widely-used system in the Linux world is the
-second extended file system (ext2), but with the newer high-capacity
-hard disks, the journaling file systems are becoming increasingly
-popular.  Here we will create an ext2 file system, but build
+second extended file system (ext2), but with newer high-capacity
+hard disks, journaling file systems are becoming increasingly
+popular.  We will create an ext2 file system, however build
 instructions for other file systems can be found at <ulink
 url="&blfs-root;view/svn/postlfs/filesystems.html"/>.</para>
 
@@ -23,8 +23,7 @@
 partition (<filename class="devicefile">hda5</filename> in our previous example).</para>
 
 <para>If a swap partition was created, it will need to be initialized
-as a swap partition too (also known as formatting, as described above
-with <command>mke2fs</command>) by running the following. If you are using an existing
+as a swap partition by using the command below. If you are using an existing
 swap partition, there is no need to format it.</para>
 
 <screen><userinput>mkswap /dev/<replaceable>[yyy]</replaceable></userinput></screen>

Modified: branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingpartition.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingpartition.xml	2005-05-12 22:07:33 UTC (rev 5319)
+++ branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/partitioning/raq2/creatingpartition.xml	2005-05-12 22:14:29 UTC (rev 5320)
@@ -7,36 +7,34 @@
 <title>Creating a New Partition</title>
 <?dbhtml filename="creatingpartition.html"?>
 
-<!--Edit Me-->
 <para>Like most other operating systems, LFS is usually installed on
-a dedicated partition.  If you have an empty partition or enough
-unpartitioned space on one of your hard disks to make one, using this
-for your LFS installation is recommended.  However, an LFS system (in
+a dedicated partition.  The recommended approach to building an LFS
+system is to use an available empty partition or, if you have enough
+unpartitioned space, to create one. However, an LFS system (in
 fact even multiple LFS systems) may also be installed on a partition
 already occupied by another operating system and the different systems
 will co-exist peacefully.  The document
-<ulink url="&hints-root;/lfs_next_to_existing_systems.txt"/> explains
+<ulink url="&hints-root;lfs_next_to_existing_systems.txt"/> explains
 how to implement this, whereas this book discusses the method of
 using a fresh partition for the installation.</para>
-<!--End Edit Me-->
 
 <para>A minimal system requires a partition of around 1.3 gigabytes
 (GB).  This is enough to store all the source tarballs and compile 
 the packages. However, if the LFS system is intended to be the primary
 Linux system, additional software will probably be installed which
 will require additional space (2 or 3 GB). The LFS system itself will
-not take up this much space. A large portion of this required amount
-of space is to provide sufficient free temporary space. Compiling
+not take up this much room. A large portion of this requirement
+is to provide sufficient free temporary storage. Compiling
 packages can require a lot of disk space which will be reclaimed after
 the package is installed.</para>
 
 <para>Because there is not always enough Random Access Memory (RAM)
 available for compilation processes, it is a good idea to use a small
-disk partition as swap space.  This space is used by the kernel to
-store seldom-used data to make room in memory for active processes.
+disk partition as swap space.  This is used by the kernel to
+store seldom-used data and leave more memory available for active processes.
 The swap partition for an LFS system can be the same as the one used
-by the host system, so another swap partition will not need to be
-created if your host system already has one setup.</para>
+by the host system, in which case it is not necessary to create another
+one.</para>
 
 <para>Start a disk partitioning program such as
 <command>cfdisk</command> or <command>fdisk</command> with a command

Modified: branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/prologue/common/audience.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/prologue/common/audience.xml	2005-05-12 22:07:33 UTC (rev 5319)
+++ branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/prologue/common/audience.xml	2005-05-12 22:14:29 UTC (rev 5320)
@@ -31,10 +31,10 @@
 
 <para>Another benefit of LFS is the ability to create a very compact
 Linux system. When installing a regular distribution, one is often
-forced to install several programs which are probably never used.
+forced to include several programs which are probably never used.
 These programs waste precious disk space, or worse, CPU cycles. It is
 not difficult to build an LFS system of less than 100 megabytes (MB),
-which is substantially smaller compared to most existing setups.  Does
+which is substantially smaller when compared to the majority of existing installations.  Does
 this still sound like a lot of space? A few of us have been working on
 creating a very small embedded LFS system. We successfully built a
 system that was specialized to run the Apache web server with




More information about the lfs-book mailing list