r5543 - branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/bootscripts/common

manuel at linuxfromscratch.org manuel at linuxfromscratch.org
Mon May 30 12:45:01 PDT 2005


Author: manuel
Date: 2005-05-30 13:44:57 -0600 (Mon, 30 May 2005)
New Revision: 5543

Modified:
   branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/bootscripts/common/usage.xml
Log:
Indented bootscripts/common/usage.xml

Modified: branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/bootscripts/common/usage.xml
===================================================================
--- branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/bootscripts/common/usage.xml	2005-05-30 19:36:39 UTC (rev 5542)
+++ branches/cross-lfs/BOOK/bootscripts/common/usage.xml	2005-05-30 19:44:57 UTC (rev 5543)
@@ -1,32 +1,35 @@
 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
-<!DOCTYPE sect1 PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.4//EN" "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.4/docbookx.dtd" [
+<!DOCTYPE sect1 PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.4//EN"
+  "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.4/docbookx.dtd" [
   <!ENTITY % general-entities SYSTEM "../../general.ent">
   %general-entities;
 ]>
+
 <sect1 id="ch-scripts-usage">
-<title>How Do These Bootscripts Work?</title>
-<?dbhtml filename="usage.html"?>
+  <?dbhtml filename="usage.html"?>
 
-<indexterm zone="ch-scripts-usage">
-<primary sortas="a-Bootscripts">Bootscripts</primary>
-<secondary>usage</secondary></indexterm>
+  <title>How Do These Bootscripts Work?</title>
 
-<para>Linux uses a special booting facility named SysVinit that is
-based on a concept of <emphasis>run-levels</emphasis>. It can be quite
-different from one system to another, so it cannot be assumed that
-because things worked in <insert distro name>, they should work
-the same in LFS too. LFS has its own way of doing things, but it
-respects generally accepted standards.</para>
+  <indexterm zone="ch-scripts-usage">
+    <primary sortas="a-Bootscripts">Bootscripts</primary>
+  <secondary>usage</secondary></indexterm>
 
-<para>SysVinit (which will be referred to as <quote>init</quote> from
-now on) works using a run-levels scheme. There are seven (from 0 to 6)
-run-levels (actually, there are more run-levels, but they are for
-special cases and are generally not used. The init man page describes
-those details), and each one of those corresponds to the actions the
-computer is supposed to perform when it starts up. The default
-run-level is 3. Here are the descriptions of the different run-levels
-as they are implemented:</para>
+  <para>Linux uses a special booting facility named SysVinit that is
+  based on a concept of <emphasis>run-levels</emphasis>. It can be quite
+  different from one system to another, so it cannot be assumed that
+  because things worked in <insert distro name>, they should work
+  the same in LFS too. LFS has its own way of doing things, but it
+  respects generally accepted standards.</para>
 
+  <para>SysVinit (which will be referred to as <quote>init</quote> from
+  now on) works using a run-levels scheme. There are seven (from 0 to 6)
+  run-levels (actually, there are more run-levels, but they are for
+  special cases and are generally not used. The init man page describes
+  those details), and each one of those corresponds to the actions the
+  computer is supposed to perform when it starts up. The default
+  run-level is 3. Here are the descriptions of the different run-levels
+  as they are implemented:</para>
+
 <literallayout>0: halt the computer
 1: single-user mode
 2: multi-user mode without networking
@@ -35,84 +38,91 @@
 5: same as 4, it is usually used for GUI login (like X's <command>xdm</command> or KDE's <command>kdm</command>)
 6: reboot the computer</literallayout>
 
-<para>The command used to change run-levels is <command>init
-<replaceable>[runlevel]</replaceable></command>, where
-<replaceable>[runlevel]</replaceable> is the target run-level. For
-example, to reboot the computer, a user would issue the <command>init
-6</command> command.  The <command>reboot</command> command is an
-alias for it, as is the <command>halt</command> command an alias for
-<command>init 0</command>.</para>
+  <para>The command used to change run-levels is <command>init
+  <replaceable>[runlevel]</replaceable></command>, where
+  <replaceable>[runlevel]</replaceable> is the target run-level. For
+  example, to reboot the computer, a user would issue the <command>init
+  6</command> command.  The <command>reboot</command> command is an
+  alias for it, as is the <command>halt</command> command an alias for
+  <command>init 0</command>.</para>
 
-<para>There are a number of directories under <filename
-class="directory">/etc/rc.d</filename> that look like <filename
-class="directory">rc?.d</filename> (where ? is the number of the
-run-level) and <filename class="directory">rcsysinit.d</filename>, all
-containing a number of symbolic links. Some begin with a
-<emphasis>K</emphasis>, the others begin with an
-<emphasis>S</emphasis>, and all of them have two numbers following the
-initial letter. The K means to stop (kill) a service and the S means
-to start a service. The numbers determine the order in which the
-scripts are run, from 00 to 99—the lower the number the earlier it
-gets executed. When init switches to another run-level, the
-appropriate services get killed and others get started.</para>
+  <para>There are a number of directories under <filename
+  class="directory">/etc/rc.d</filename> that look like <filename
+  class="directory">rc?.d</filename> (where ? is the number of the
+  run-level) and <filename class="directory">rcsysinit.d</filename>, all
+  containing a number of symbolic links. Some begin with a
+  <emphasis>K</emphasis>, the others begin with an
+  <emphasis>S</emphasis>, and all of them have two numbers following the
+  initial letter. The K means to stop (kill) a service and the S means
+  to start a service. The numbers determine the order in which the
+  scripts are run, from 00 to 99—the lower the number the earlier it
+  gets executed. When init switches to another run-level, the
+  appropriate services get killed and others get started.</para>
 
-<para>The real scripts are in <filename
-class="directory">/etc/rc.d/init.d</filename>. They do the actual
-work, and the symlinks all point to them. Killing links and starting
-links point to the same script in <filename
-class="directory">/etc/rc.d/init.d</filename>. This is because the
-scripts can be called with different parameters like
-<parameter>start</parameter>, <parameter>stop</parameter>,
-<parameter>restart</parameter>, <parameter>reload</parameter>, and
-<parameter>status</parameter>. When a K link is encountered, the
-appropriate script is run with the <parameter>stop</parameter>
-argument. When an S link is encountered, the appropriate script is run
-with the <parameter>start</parameter> argument.</para>
+  <para>The real scripts are in <filename
+  class="directory">/etc/rc.d/init.d</filename>. They do the actual work,
+  and the symlinks all point to them. Killing links and starting links point
+  to the same script in <filename class="directory">/etc/rc.d/init.d</filename>.
+  This is because the scripts can be called with different parameters like
+  <option>start</option>, <option>stop</option>, <option>restart</option>,
+  <option>reload</option>, and <option>status</option>. When a K link is
+  encountered, the appropriate script is run with the <option>stop</option>
+  argument. When an S link is encountered, the appropriate script is run
+  with the <option>start</option> argument.</para>
 
-<para>There is one exception to this explanation. Links that start
-with an <emphasis>S</emphasis> in the <filename
-class="directory">rc0.d</filename> and <filename
-class="directory">rc6.d</filename> directories will not cause anything
-to be started. They will be called with the parameter
-<parameter>stop</parameter> to stop something. The logic behind this
-is that when a user is going to reboot or halt the system, nothing
-needs to be started.  The system only needs to be stopped.</para>
+  <para>There is one exception to this explanation. Links that start
+  with an <emphasis>S</emphasis> in the <filename
+  class="directory">rc0.d</filename> and <filename
+  class="directory">rc6.d</filename> directories will not cause anything
+  to be started. They will be called with the parameter
+  <option>stop</option> to stop something. The logic behind this
+  is that when a user is going to reboot or halt the system, nothing
+  needs to be started. The system only needs to be stopped.</para>
 
-<para>These are descriptions of what the arguments make the scripts
-do:</para>
+  <para>These are descriptions of what the arguments make the scripts
+  do:</para>
 
-<variablelist>
-<varlistentry>
-<term><parameter>start</parameter></term>
-<listitem><para>The service is started.</para></listitem>
-</varlistentry>
+  <variablelist>
+    <varlistentry>
+      <term><option>start</option></term>
+      <listitem>
+        <para>The service is started.</para>
+      </listitem>
+    </varlistentry>
 
-<varlistentry>
-<term><parameter>stop</parameter></term>
-<listitem><para>The service is stopped.</para></listitem>
-</varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
+      <term><option>stop</option></term>
+      <listitem>
+        <para>The service is stopped.</para>
+      </listitem>
+    </varlistentry>
 
-<varlistentry>
-<term><parameter>restart</parameter></term>
-<listitem><para>The service is stopped and then started again.</para></listitem>
-</varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
+      <term><option>restart</option></term>
+      <listitem>
+        <para>The service is stopped and then started again.</para>
+      </listitem>
+    </varlistentry>
 
-<varlistentry>
-<term><parameter>reload</parameter></term>
-<listitem><para>The configuration of the service is updated.
-This is used after the configuration file of a service was modified, when 
-the service does not need to be restarted.</para></listitem>
-</varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
+      <term><option>reload</option></term>
+      <listitem>
+        <para>The configuration of the service is updated. This is used
+        after the configuration file of a service was modified, when the
+        service does not need to be restarted.</para>
+      </listitem>
+    </varlistentry>
 
-<varlistentry>
-<term><parameter>status</parameter></term>
-<listitem><para>Tells if the service is running and with which PIDs.</para></listitem>
-</varlistentry>
-</variablelist>
+    <varlistentry>
+      <term><option>status</option></term>
+      <listitem>
+        <para>Tells if the service is running and with which PIDs.</para>
+      </listitem>
+    </varlistentry>
+  </variablelist>
 
-<para>Feel free to modify the way the boot process works (after all,
-it is your own LFS system). The files given here are an example of how
-it can be done.</para>
+  <para>Feel free to modify the way the boot process works (after all,
+  it is your own LFS system). The files given here are an example of how
+  it can be done.</para>
 
 </sect1>
-




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